Reno supporters demand better – Graham

first_imgWESTERN BUREAU:Struggling FC Reno will have to find a way to avoid relegation, says the club’s head coach, Michael Graham, after watching his team give up a one-goal lead to title chasing Humble Lion in Sunday’s 1-1 draw in the Red Stripe Premier League.”I am a little disappointed because at 1-0 up and playing well in the first half, we came out flat in the second-half and allowed Humble Lion too much time on the ball and a goal we were dreading happened,” stated Graham.Reno are precariously perched just above the relegation zone with 31 points in 10th place, but have breathing room between themselves and red zone teams Rivoli United (23) and Waterhouse FC (22).That, however, is no comfort to the ambitious Graham, who believes winning a paltry seven matches out of 27 is not good enough for the three-time League winners.According to Graham, the club’s rich history and the passionate diehard supporters demand more from their players.”We know where we are letting down the fans. We have an all-round decent squad of players, but for some reason, we cannot get the ball into the net. We tend to create plenty chances in match situations and score few.”That is why we are not doing as well as we would like, and it’s hurting the club’s prospects going forward,” reasoned Graham.Roshane Sharpe has taken on the club’s goal-getter role, netting his sixth goal of the season in Sunday’s match against Humble Lion at Frome Sports Complex.biggest headacheHowever, it’s in defence that Graham has the biggest headache. Reno have conceded 40 goals in all this season, making them the league’s second-worst defensive team behind ninth-placed Boys’ Town FC (43).”We realised that we are not doing a good job in defence, even though we have who I consider good players in there. We are not scoring enough, and on the other hand, we are conceding too many,” Graham said.”That is a recipe for disaster, and the club can do without that at the moment. However, we still have some critical matches ahead of us, so we must give our all to put ourselves at least mid-pack at the end of season,” added Graham.last_img read more

2 killed, 16 hurt in sandstorm crashes

first_imgA family of 11 visiting from Fortaleza, Brazil, and on their way to Las Vegas were in a van that crashed. Nine of them were injured and taken to Antelope Valley Hospital with broken arms, legs and lacerations, a family member said. “All my family was in this van, all 11,” a sobbing Fernando Amaral Pontes, 46, said. Markan Rios, a passenger in the van, was visibly shaken as he waited next to the crumbled van for someone to take him and Pontes to the hospital. “I couldn’t see anything. It was too much and too quick,” Rios said. “I was coming in, and I saw the sand, and we slowed down, but the truck in front of us had stalled and we couldn’t stop.” Anthony Valdespino, who drives through the area daily, told KCAL Channel 9 “everybody just came to an abrupt stop. There were people that were speeding, and unfortunately I don’t know if they made it through or not.” Valdespino recalled the sound of brakes screeching all around him. “I’ve never seen dust like that,” he said. “I’ve lived out here most of my life, and I’ve never seen dust that thick like that before.” The accident happened just west of Edwards Air Force Base and at the northern edge of Los Angeles County. It was about 40 miles northeast of the site of a fiery truck pileup Friday night in a tunnel on the Interstate 5 freeway in Santa Clarita. The cause of that crash, which killed three people and injured 10, is still under investigation. Authorities said 31 vehicles, including one passenger car and dozens of big rigs, piled up in a chain-reaction crash inside the tunnel that carries truck traffic through the area toward Los Angeles. Tuesday’s crash left big rigs and passenger cars scattered and bent on the pavement and dirt center divider. The CHP closed all northbound lanes of Highway 14, causing traffic to back up for miles. It reopened about five hours later.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! L.A. COUNTY: Winds lead to wrecks that involved 15 vehicles on Highway 14. By Gillian Flaccus THE ASSOCIATED PRESS AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m. Over a dozen vehicles slammed into one another when a blinding sandstorm surprised motorists Tuesday in the high desert north of Los Angeles, killing at least two and injuring 16. Two of the injured were in critical condition after the crash that left vehicles scattered across Highway 14, Los Angeles County Fire Inspector Ron Haralson said. The pileup was reported around 1:40p.m. during a sandstorm whipped by winds gusting up to 55 mph, the National Weather Service said. About 15 vehicles were involved in three separate collisions, said California Highway Patrol Officer Henry Ross. He said the cause of the crashes were under investigation but that poor visibility and high winds “didn’t help matters at all.” last_img read more

How Will Home-Based 3D Printers Impact the Economy?

first_imgRelated Posts Frank Landman Follow the Puck Frank is a freelance journalist who has worked in various editorial capacities for over 10 years. He covers trends in technology as they relate to business. Thanks to advanced IoT technology, we may soon live in an era where home-based 3D printers are as common as refrigerators. As long as you have the raw materials necessary, and an internet connection to find the design templates you need, you could print practically anything, from a pocket comb to a new table for your living room.For creative minds and ambitious inventors, this is a thrilling prospect, but how would it affect our economy at large?The Potential Economic RamificationsWith any new technology, it’s important to recognize the potential economic consequences of a full-fledged takeover. Assuming most American households eventually have a 3D printer available, how could that impact the economy?Less consumer spending. If you had a choice between buying a new set of bookends for $50 and printing one yourself for a few cents, which would you choose? Unless those bookends have some special personal appeal, you’ll go with the latter. On an individual basis, this choice may not matter much, but once millions of people start opting to print their own items, rather than purchasing them, overall consumer spending could drop, which could be grounds for an economic recession.Rise in demand for plastics. The main types of materials used for 3D printing are ABS, PLA, and PVA plastics, though others are sure to emerge as they become more feasible and less costly. In the interim, if there’s a surge of consumers relying on these products for their own 3D printing needs, it could drive up demand for the raw materials. If the prices of raw materials are driven up, it could stifle the growth of 3D printing overall.Demand for designs and specs. There will almost certainly be increased demand for design specs; consumers will want to put their printers to good use, but may not have the time or the technical ability to create their own designs. Accordingly, sites and individuals who work to distribute more designs will see a surge in sales and/or traffic.Job loss. 3D printing has the power to make manufacturing far less expensive—and more automated. Accordingly, we may see the loss of some human jobs in the manufacturing industry. Granted, this is an industry-level effect, but it could restrict income and buying power for residential consumers if it unfolds on a large enough scale.Arguments for Little to No EffectOf course, it could be argued that the rise of home-based 3D printing may have little to no economic impact, whatsoever.For example:Home-based printers didn’t abolish the printing industry. Consider this: modern printing companies are as efficient and profitable as ever, offering printing for far less money than it would cost to print at home. Home-based traditional printers have barely affected the industry at all. We might see a similar effect with 3D printers, where industrial prototyping and manufacturing remain more cost-efficient than any home setup.3D printing tech is still expensive. Though prices have fallen sharply since the initial rise of the technology, it’s still going to cost you at least a few hundred dollars if you want a 3D printer at home. This is going to be a prohibitive obstacle for people wanting to start creating their own materials, but it may stoke the fires of innovation in companies capable of producing more cost-efficient printers.Not all consumers want a 3D printer. We also need to consider the realities of consumer demand. A few years ago, only one in three American consumers were interested in buying a 3D printer. If consumers aren’t generally interested in having a 3D printer at home, the reach of the technology will be stunted, and all these potential economic ramifications will be inherently limited—at least until demand increases in the future.So how, exactly, will 3D printers transform our economy? There are many variables at play here, so it’s difficult to say for sure. 3D printing has awesome production capabilities, both for manufacturers and individuals, but it’s so early in its development that it’s nearly impossible to tell how it will grow from here—or how it could affect our buying habits.center_img Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… Top 5 Areas Where Companies Want IoT Solutionslast_img read more

NEW CBC SERIES BECOMING CANADIAN TELLS THE STORIES OF CANADAS NEWEST CITIZENS

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook Advertisement Episodic Descriptions:Episode 1 (Monday, June 26 at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT)): Rachel was assigned male at birth, but always knew she was a woman. Ellaha came from an educated family in Afghanistan, but was told by the Taliban that girls could no longer attend school.  Kerstin grew up trapped inside East Berlin until the Berlin Wall came down. Syed’s mother was six months pregnant with him when an accident killed his father leaving his mother to raise her two sons.Episode 2 (Monday, June 26 at 8:30 p.m. (9 p.m. NT)): Mohamad left war-torn Lebanon to become a medical doctor in Canada. Mo has a career she never would have imagined possible back in China. After leaving Trinidad, Jerome rediscovered his love of soccer in his new home country. After hearing about the ‘politeness’ of Canada, Annabelle and Aidan decided to raise their children here.Episode 3 (Wednesday, June 28 at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT)): With tribal warfare raging, Jemal fled to the world’s largest refugee camp, leaving his pregnant wife behind.  Janice came to Canada and found a job and the love of her life at a Tim Hortons. Abimbola realized his dream of bodybuilding in Canada, something he would never have done back in Nigeria. Rita and her family fled from Iraq to Syria – a relatively safer place at the time. She ended up being on the last plane out of Damascus before the airport was closed.Episode 4 (Thursday, June 29 at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT)): Hsa’s family was given a simple choice by his homeland’s oppressive government: flee or die. From a region known for rugby, Rhys moved to Canada for his love of hockey. Juliette wants to break the cycle of systemic racism and teach her kids to appreciate the diversity of Canada. Esther went from a Mexican living a secret life in the US to being a married Maritimer.Episode 5 (Friday, June 30 at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT)): Gannon came to Canada for love. Tony brought his experience to a small prairie town and reopened the local Legion to support veterans. Kallie lost everything when she arrived in Canada, but she built a successful and fulfilling business with hard work. Following a chance encounter on a cruise ship, Romulo moved to Canada and changed his family’s lives for the better.Episode 6 (Friday, June 30 at 8:30 p.m. (9 p.m. NT)): With three young daughters and financial struggles, John and Claudia took the biggest risks of their lives – moving to Canada to start a business without knowing how to speak English. An 88-year old is proud of all her accomplishments, including her four-person marriage and now adds her long-awaited, hard-earned Canadian citizenship to the list. Sharmila was expecting to become a Canadian alongside her mother but an unfortunate illness had her sharing her citizenship ceremony with her young daughter instead.  Saliu and Adeola moved from a big city in Nigeria to a small town in Regina with reservations but found an unexpected new way of life.BECOMING CANADIAN is produced in by Antica Productions and eOne in association with CBC, with the participation of the Canada Media Fund, the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit and with the participation of the Bell Fund. The series is executive produced by eOne’s Jocelyn Hamilton and Antica’s Stuart Coxe and produced by Brad Brough and Jeanette Trigiani Diehl for Antica.CBC/Radio-Canada is proud to have CIBC as a partner in celebrating Canada’s 150th anniversary, in the same year that CIBC is also turning 150. For full 2017 programming information please visit 2017guide.cbc.ca..About CBC/Radio-CanadaCBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster and one of its largest cultural institutions. We are Canada’s trusted source of news, information and Canadian entertainment. Deeply rooted in communities all across the country, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We also provide international news and information from a uniquely Canadian perspective. In 2017, CBC/Radio-Canada will at the heart of the celebrations and conversations with special 2017-themed multiplatform programming and events across Canada.About Antica ProductionsAntica produces engaging, award-winning, nation-building content. We’ve proven that our TV, digital, podcast, and branded entertainment start important national conversations. From large studio shows to intimate films and documentaries, Antica gets people talking about history, science, music, sports, and so much more. Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Narrated by Canadian rapper and producer Kardinal Offishall, new six-part factual series BECOMING CANADIAN will premiere on CBC with back-to-back episodes on Monday, June 26 at 8 p.m. (8:30 NT), with additional episodes airing throughout the week in the lead up to Canada 150 on July 1. Produced by Antica Productions Ltd. in association with global independent studio Entertainment One (eOne), the series captures citizenship ceremonies from across Canada and reveals the amazing, inspiring and heart-warming stories of some of the approximately 250,000 people who will become Canadians in 2016/2017. All of these new Canadians have stories that are as diverse as the number of countries they are emigrating from, ranging from heartbreaking and tragic, to inspirational and uplifting. With four stories in each half-hour episode, the series captures, firsthand, how life-changing becoming Canadian can be for new citizens and those closest to them.First launched online in January 2017 with short-form digital content, BECOMING CANADIAN has amassed hundreds of participants and thousands of followers on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and cbc.ca/2017/becoming-canadian. The digital extension of the series will feature additional new content and stories throughout the rest of 2017.Full Broadcast Schedule:Monday, June 26 at 8 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. (8:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. NT)Wednesday, June 28 at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT)Thursday, June 29 at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT)Friday, June 30 at 8 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. (8:30 and 9 p.m. NT) Twitterlast_img read more