Records from 1987 World Cup

first_imgRecords from 1987 World CupThe neutral umpires stood for the first time in this edition of the tournamentAsantha de Mel of Sri Lanka conceded 97 runs from 10 overs against the West Indies in 1987 – the most expensive figures till date.India’s Chetan Sharma became the first bowler in the World Cup to take a hat-trick. He clean bowled Kiwis Ken Rutherford, Ian Smith and Ewen Chatfield.Sunil Gavaskar, who bid adieu to international cricket after this World Cup also scored the first and the last ODI ton of his career here. He scored 103 not out against New Zealand in his penultimate ODI innings in Nagpur.last_img read more

Ontario truck driver charged in Quebec in connection with fatal hit and

first_imgMONTREAL – A truck driver from Brampton, Ont., is facing four charges related to a fatal hit and run south of Montreal last August.Harmandeep Singh, 23, was charged Thursday with hit and run after causing the death of one person, two of hit and run after causing bodily harm to two people, and one of hit and run involving a fourth person.Quebec provincial police arrested Singh at Montreal’s Trudeau airport when he returned from India on Wednesday.He will have a bail hearing Friday.A 21-year-old Mexican national vacationing in Quebec was killed in the collision on eastbound Highway 30 in Brossard on Aug. 3.A tractor-trailer struck the vehicle at about 1 a.m., causing it to hit a lamppost, before it drove away. The victim was a passenger in the back seat.The suspect’s vehicle was found a day later in the Montreal borough of Lachine and a warrant was issued shortly after.Police spokeswoman Joyce Kemp said Singh was aware he would be arrested upon landing in Montreal.“There had been contact between the police officers and the suspect before he returned to Canada,” Kemp said.last_img read more

Crude awakenings stabilizing oil unlikely to improve the TSXs performance in 2018

first_imgTORONTO – While stabilizing oil prices helped Canadian equities break out of their doldrums in the second half of 2017, investors expecting the Toronto Stock Exchange to catch up with its outperforming global peers in the new year should instead anticipate more modest returns with the add-on of greater market volatility.“Despite being flat in the early part of the year and then posting some gains here in the back half of the year, the swings in equity prices on the S&P/TSX composite index have been incredibly small by historical standards,” said Craig Fehr, a Canadian markets strategist with Edward Jones. “And so I think the first thing we can expect from the TSX is much bigger swings in prices, much more volatility on a daily and weekly basis.”“All that said, I think there’s still more gas left in the tank for this bull market,” he added, referencing the eight-plus years of global gains since the dark days of 2009 in the wake of the last recession. “I think we can see positive returns again in 2018. I would expect them to be relatively muted so … Canadian equities, domestic equities, still underperform international markets.”After hitting a record high of 15,922.67 on Feb. 21, the TSX steadily declined to a low of 14,951.88 by Aug. 21, down 2.2 per cent on the year at the time. A resurgence in oil — which saw crude prices rally from a 2017 low of US$42.53 per barrel on June 21 to a barrier-breaking high of US$60.42 on the final trading day of the year — sparked a surge in energy shares that saw the TSX complete its first of many record closes in the latter half of 2017. By Dec. 27 and Dec. 28, the TSX closed at consecutive record highs of 16,203.13 and 16,221.95, respectively. It finished 2017 at 16,209.13, ahead 921.54 points or about six per cent on the year.By comparison, Wall Street’s S&P 500 index — the American equivalent to the TSX — gained 434.78 points or about 19 per cent in 2017. The Dow Jones industrial average added 4,956.62 points or about 25 per cent, and the Nasdaq composite index gained 1,520.27 points or about 28 per cent.One the most dominant themes in equity markets in 2017 was the trend toward stability from cyclicality in an otherwise uncertain political and geopolitical backdrop, said Candice Bangsund, vice president and portfolio manager at Fiera Capital. This saw the more defensive U.S. equity markets, which are heavily weighted towards technological growth, thrive last year. Meanwhile, the cyclically-based Canadian equity markets made up primarily of financial, energy and materials sectors were largely underappreciated.While oil is a key influence on the commodity-heavy TSX, economist Todd Mattina of Mackenzie Investments said he expects it to remain range-bound around its current level of US$50 to US$60 a barrel going into the new year — a level that will not really help the index in a meaningful way.“The TSX has benefited in recent months because of the strong rally in oil prices. But there’s a number of uncertainties going into 2018 that also cloud the outlook,” he said. “One of them is how much further can oil prices rally? … To the extent that higher oil prices since September have supported gains in the TSX, a risk factor in 2018 is that oil prices could run into resistance if U.S. shale producers increase production at today’s higher price levels.”Still, oil only touches upon one of several possible risks for the TSX in 2018, Mattina added. “The oil price outlook is not the driver of our bearish view of Canadian stocks. We are underweight the Canadian stock market because valuations are not highly attractive relative to other major stock markets and our indicators of investor sentiment look bearish.”He said that in addition to the policy uncertainty around ongoing NAFTA renegotiations, another factor weighing on the TSX is the perennial concern about very high levels of Canadian household debt and how that will affect consumer spending in the forthcoming years. Statistics Canada reported in December that household credit market debt as a proportion of household disposable income increased to 171.1 per cent in the third quarter of 2017, up from 170.1 per cent in the second quarter. That means there was $1.71 in credit market debt, which includes consumer credit and mortgage and non-mortgage loans, for every dollar of household disposable income.While consumers were the dominant engine behind growth last year amid solid employment gains, Bangsund said she expects trade and business development to take the baton in 2018 as earlier fears of a U.S. and global economic slowdown have proven unfounded in 2017. That could see the cyclical segments of the market that favour Canadian equities regain leadership performance.“The TSX will be the main beneficiary if that scenario of stronger growth and rising commodity prices does continue into 2018 due to that cyclicality of the Canadian stock market,” she said.A 2018 global market outlook report by Russell Investments Canada Ltd. also supports higher Canadian equity prices due to late-cycle tailwinds while still cautioning that it also expects volatility to be higher over 2018 versus 2017 as markets start to consider the timing of the next recession. Given this uncertainty around the domestic equities, the Russell report concluded it’s “modestly positive on Canadian equities with a price target of 16,900 for year-end 2018 for the S&P/TSX composite index.”Should Canadian equity returns in 2018 mirror those of the prior 12 months, Fehr said investors should keep in mind that while that doesn’t stack up well against the juggernaut momentum seen in other global markets, they are still relatively healthy gains.“For the Canadian market by historical standards it’s certainly solid,” he said. “It’s underperformance but it’s positive performance, so it’s not terrible.”Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter.last_img read more

Business Highlights

first_img___GM says it has 2,700 jobs for workers slated to be laid offDETROIT (AP) — The General Motors’ massive 14,000-person layoff announced last month might not be as bad as originally projected. The company said Friday that 2,700 out of the 3,300 factory jobs slated for elimination will now be saved by adding jobs at other U.S. factories. Blue-collar workers in many cities will still lose jobs when GM shutters four U.S. factories next year. But most could find employment at other GM plants. Some would have to relocate.___Stocks plunge to 8-month lows on growth fears; J&J nosedivesNEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fall sharply on Wall Street, shaving 496 points off the Dow Jones Industrial Average, as traders worry about signs of weaker economic growth in China and Europe. Disarray mounts surrounding Britain’s impending departure from the European Union. Johnson & Johnson plunged after Reuters reported the company has known for decades that its talc sometimes contained asbestos, a claim the company denied.___Detentions raise fears, cast doubt on China’s policiesWASHINGTON (AP) — By detaining two Canadians in an apparent act of retribution, China is making itself look like the country its harshest critics say it is: one unbound by the laws, rules and procedures that govern other major industrial nations. Canada’s arrest of a top Chinese technology executive at the request of the United States has set off a diplomatic furor with Beijing.___Scandal-plagued CBS grants $20M to 18 women’s rights groupsNEW YORK (AP) — CBS is pledging to give $20 million to 18 organizations dedicated to eliminating sexual harassment in the workplace as the network tries to recover from the scandal that forced the ouster of its top executive, Les Moonves. CBS said Friday that the money will go toward helping the organizations expand their work and “ties into the company’s ongoing commitment to strengthening its own workplace culture.”___J&J hammered by report it knew of asbestos in baby powderNEW YORK (AP) — Johnson & Johnson is forcefully denying a media report that it knew for decades about the existence of trace amounts of asbestos in its baby powder. The report Friday by the Reuters news service sent company shares into a tailspin, suffering their worst sell-off in 16 years.___EU leaders approve small steps to buttress euro currencyFRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — European leaders have agreed to press ahead with a limited, common eurozone budget and other steps to strengthen the currency union’s resistance to downturns and crises. The budget proposal leaves its size undefined. Friday’s deal appeared to fall short of more sweeping ideas pushed by French President Emmanuel Macron.___China suspends tariff hikes on $126B of US cars, auto partsBEIJING (AP) — China has announced a 90-day suspension of tariff hikes on $126 billion of U.S. cars, trucks and auto parts following its trade cease-fire with Washington. The suspension follows President Donald Trump’s agreement to postpone planned U.S. tariff hikes on Chinese imports for 90 days while the two sides negotiate over American complaints about Beijing’s technology policy and trade surplus. The Chinese tax agency said the suspension takes effect Jan. 1.___US industrial production climbed 0.6 per cent in NovemberWASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. industrial production climbed 0.6 per cent on surging output at mines and utilities. But manufacturing production was flat. The Federal Reserve says that utility output rose 3.3 per cent as power companies were busier because of unusually cold weather. Mining output rose 1.7 per cent on higher production at coal mines and oil and gas drillers.___Bug may have exposed photos from 7M Facebook usersNEW YORK (AP) — Facebook’s privacy controls have broken down yet again, this time through a software flaw affecting nearly 7 million users who had photos exposed to a much wider audience than intended. The bug disclosed Friday gave hundreds of apps unauthorized access to photos that could in theory include images that would embarrass some of the affected users. They also included photos people may have uploaded but hadn’t yet posted, perhaps because they had changed their mind.___Macron urges calm, Paris police prepare for more violencePARIS (AP) — French President Emanuel Macron is calling for calm as authorities prepare for a possible fifth straight weekend of violent protests on the streets of Paris. Officials plan to deploy armoured vehicles and thousands of security forces against the “yellow vest” demonstrators, who have been angered by high taxes and a sense that the government is detached from the everyday struggles of workers.___The S&P 500 index lost 50.59 points, or 1.9 per cent, to 2,599.95. The Dow retreated 496.87 points, or 2 per cent, to 24,100.51. The Nasdaq composite slid 159.67 points, or 2.3 per cent, to 6,910.66. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks fell 21.89 points, or 1.5 per cent, to 1,410.81.Benchmark U.S. crude fell 2.6 per cent to $51.20 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, dropped 1.9 per cent to settle at $60.28 a barrel in London. Wholesale gasoline lost 3 per cent to $1.43 a gallon. Heating oil fell 1.7 per cent to $1.85 a gallon and natural gas dropped 7.2 per cent to $3.83 per 1,000 cubic feet.The Associated Presslast_img read more

The Best Reynald Pedros rules as womens coach

first_imgThe former Marseille, Parma, Napoli and Lyon footballer is now ruling women’s football thanks to his managerial skills with Lyon WomenOlympique Lyonnais Féminin is a project founded in 2004 by Olympique Lyonnais in the French football league.Since then, the team has won a record 16 Division 1 championships, 9 Coupe de France, and 5 UEFA Women’s Champions League.Their most recent win came on May 24th, when Lyon Women beat Germany’s Wolfsburg 4-1 after extra time.And apart from the footballer’s work, one man has made this possible: Reynald Pedros.The former Parma, Napoli, Montpellier, Marseille and Lyon player is now ready to coach in his most difficult adventure.Apart from winning the Women’s Champions League, he also was selected today as The Best FIFA Women’s Coach, beating Asako Takakura from Japan and Sarina Wiegman from the Netherlands.Tessa Wullaert, Manchester CityWullaert says City are ready for the Women’s Champions League Manuel R. Medina – September 9, 2019 According to Manchester City forward Tessa Wullaert his team can focus now on the UEFA Women’s Champions League after defeating Manchester United on Saturday.There were originally ten coaches shortlisted, but on September 3rd, the three finalists were announced.This is the first time a man has won the award since past winners include Silvia Neid from Germany in 2016 and Wiegman from the Netherlands just last year.The Best FIFA Women’s Coach Award 2016: Silvia Neid – Germany 2017: Sarina Wiegman – Netherlands 2018: Reynald Pedros – Lyon WomenCongratulations, Reynald Pedros 👏Winner of #TheBest FIFA Women’s Coach 2018 🏆#FIFAFootballAwards pic.twitter.com/dKDXBHW3km— FIFA Women’s World Cup 🇫🇷 (@FIFAWWC) September 24, 2018last_img read more