Mbarara City defeat Busoga United to register a second victory of the season on Tuesday

first_imgAction between Mbarara City and Busoga United on Tuesday. (PHOTO/Racheal Tebandeke)Uganda Premier LeagueMbarara City 2-1 Busoga UnitedLuzira PrisonsBrian Aheebwa and Paul Mucurezi scored for Mbarara to earn new coach, Paul Nkata a perfect start at the club.For the visitors, Ibrahim Mugulusi scored the consolation goal.Mbarara made their intentions known and Busoga’s goalkeeper Omedwa Rogers was the busiest player in the first 15 minutes of the game – The shot stopper kept out Mucurezi’s sixth minute shot before denying Ahebwa and Sseguja Swalik.The hosts’ continued pressure was rewarded in the 16th minute when Aheebwa nodded in from Paul Mucureezi’s cross.Few minutes after, Mbarara would have doubled their lead but unmarked Onyai Raymond shot over the bar.Busoga put up a commendable challenge to level matters but the efforts were in vain. Anthony Mayanja’s header rattled the woodwork while Joel Madondo fired far and wide.Busoga’s coach-Abby Bogere made an early change with Jeromey Kirya paving way for Tezikya Lawrence at the half hour mark.The visitors came back strong and halved the deficit in the 53rd minute with substitute Mugulusi who had replaced Madondo in 49th minute, scored a beauty in the top left corner outside the box after Mbarara failed  to clear away the corner.Ikara denied Mugulusi an equaliser from freekick as Mbarara survived a late Busoga United goal.Mucureezi was named the man of the match for an assist and a goal.Mbarara will visit Wakiso Giants on Friday, October 4th in their next game while Busoga host Villa SC.Lineups used.Mbarara City FC – Tom Ikara, Othieno Stephen, John Adriko, Bamba Soulyemane, Hillary Mukundane, Pistis Balenge, Ssegujja Swalik, Onyayi Raymond, Paul Mucurezi, Brian Aheebwa, Ibrahim Orit.Busoga United – Omedwa Rogers, Otwau Abubaker, Kawawulo Isma, Kakeeto Shafik, Muganga Douglas, Kasonko Gorge, Kirya Jeromey, Mayanja Anthony, Wani Ivan, Zirintusa Boban, Madondo Joel.Comments Tags: Bamba SoulyemaneBrian AheebwaHillary MukundaneIbrahim OritJohn AdrikoMabarara City FCOnyayi RaymondOthieno Stephenpaul mucureziPistis BalengeSsegujja SwalikTom Ikaralast_img read more

GitHub For Beginners: Don’t Get Scared, Get Started

first_imgIt’s 2013, and there’s no way around it: you need to learn how to use GitHub.Why? Because it’s a social network that has completely changed the way we work. Having started as a developer’s collaborative platform, GitHub is now the largest online storage space of collaborative works that exists in the world. Whether you’re interested in participating in this global mind meld or in researching this massive file dump of human knowledge, you need to be here.See also: GitHub For Beginners: Commit, Push And GoSimply by being a member, you can brush elbows with the likes of Google, Facebook and Calendar. Before GitHub existed, major companies created their knowledge mainly in private. But when you access their GitHub accounts, you’re free to download, study, and build upon anything they add to the network. So what are you waiting for?Looking For GitHub AnswersAs embarrassing as it is to admit, this tutorial came into being because all of the “GitHub for Beginners” articles I read were way over my head. That’s probably because I don’t have a strong programming background, like most GitHub users. I couldn’t identify with the way most tutorials suggest using GitHub, as a showcase for my programming work.See also: Github’s Tom Preston-Werner: How We Went MainstreamWhat you might not know is that there are plenty of reasons to use GitHub if you’re not a programmer. According to GitHub’s educational videos, any knowledge worker can benefit, with “knowledge worker” defined as most any profession that makes use of a computer.If you’ve given up on understanding how to use GitHub, this article is for you.One of the main misconceptions about GitHub is that it’s a development tool, as much a part of coding as computer languages and compilers. However, GitHub itself isn’t much more than a social network like Facebook or Flickr. You build a profile, upload projects to share and connect with other users by “following” their accounts. And while many users store programs and code projects, there’s nothing preventing you from keeping text documents or other file types in your project folders to show off. The author’s Terminal screen on a Mac.GitHub makes Git easier to use in two ways. First, if you download the GitHub software to your computer, it provides a visual interface to help you manage your version-controlled projects locally. Second, creating an account on GitHub.com brings your version-controlled projects to the Web, and ties in social network features for good measure.You can browse other GitHub users’ projects, and even download copies for yourself to alter and learn from. Other users can do the same with your public projects, and even spot errors and suggest fixes. Either way, no data is lost because Git saves a “snapshot” of every change.While it’s possible to use GitHub without learning Git, there’s a big difference between using and understanding. Before I figured out Git I could use GitHub, but I didn’t really understand why. In this tutorial, we’re going to learn to use Git on the command line.Words People Use When They Talk About GitIn this tutorial, there are a few words I’m going to use repeatedly, none of which I’d heard before I started learning. Here’s the big ones:Command Line: The computer program we use to input Git commands. On a Mac, it’s called Terminal. On a PC, it’s a non-native program that you download when you download Git for the first time (we’ll do that in the next section). In both cases, you type text-based commands, known as prompts, into the screen, instead of using a mouse.Repository: A directory or storage space where your projects can live. Sometimes GitHub users shorten this to “repo.” It can be local to a folder on your computer, or it can be a storage space on GitHub or another online host. You can keep code files, text files, image files, you name it, inside a repository.Version Control: Basically, the purpose Git was designed to serve. When you have a Microsoft Word file, you either overwrite every saved file with a new save, or you save multiple versions. With Git, you don’t have to. It keeps “snapshots” of every point in time in the project’s history, so you can never lose or overwrite it.Commit: This is the command that gives Git its power. When you commit, you are taking a “snapshot” of your repository at that point in time, giving you a checkpoint to which you can reevaluate or restore your project to any previous state.Branch: How do multiple people work on a project at the same time without Git getting them confused? Usually, they “branch off” of the main project with their own versions full of changes they themselves have made. After they’re done, it’s time to “merge” that branch back with the “master,” the main directory of the project.Git-Specific CommandsSince Git was designed with a big project like Linux in mind, there are a lot of Git commands. However, to use the basics of Git, you’ll only need to know a few terms. They all begin the same way, with the word “git.”git init: Initializes a new Git repository. Until you run this command inside a repository or directory, it’s just a regular folder. Only after you input this does it accept further Git commands.git config: Short for “configure,” this is most useful when you’re setting up Git for the first time.git help: Forgot a command? Type this into the command line to bring up the 21 most common git commands. You can also be more specific and type “git help init” or another term to figure out how to use and configure a specific git command.git status: Check the status of your repository. See which files are inside it, which changes still need to be committed, and which branch of the repository you’re currently working on.git add: This does not add new files to your repository. Instead, it brings new files to Git’s attention. After you add files, they’re included in Git’s “snapshots” of the repository.git commit: Git’s most important command. After you make any sort of change, you input this in order to take a “snapshot” of the repository. Usually it goes git commit -m “Message here.” The -m indicates that the following section of the command should be read as a message.git branch: Working with multiple collaborators and want to make changes on your own? This command will let you build a new branch, or timeline of commits, of changes and file additions that are completely your own. Your title goes after the command. If you wanted a new branch called “cats,” you’d type git branch cats.git checkout: Literally allows you to “check out” a repository that you are not currently inside. This is a navigational command that lets you move to the repository you want to check. You can use this command as git checkout master to look at the master branch, or git checkout cats to look at another branch.git merge: When you’re done working on a branch, you can merge your changes back to the master branch, which is visible to all collaborators. git merge cats would take all the changes you made to the “cats” branch and add them to the master.git push: If you’re working on your local computer, and want your commits to be visible online on GitHub as well, you “push” the changes up to GitHub with this command.git pull: If you’re working on your local computer and want the most up-to-date version of your repository to work with, you “pull” the changes down from GitHub with this command.Setting Up GitHub And Git For The First Time These Mistakes Can Derail a Legacy Software Con… Creating a local Git repository in three steps.However, your computer now realizes this directory is Git-ready, and you can start inputting Git commands. Now you’ve got both an online and a local repo for your project to live inside. In Part 2 of this series, you will learn how to make your first commit to local and GitHub repositories, and learn about more great GitHub resources.(See also: GitHub For Beginners: Commit, Push And Go) Related Posts Tags:#GitHub#How To#version control Baby’s first Git commands.Creating Your Online RepositoryNow that you’re all set up, it’s time to create a place for your project to live. Both Git and GitHub refer to this as a repository, or “repo” for short, a digital directory or storage space where you can access your project, its files, and all the versions of its files that Git saves.Go back to GitHub.com and click the tiny book icon next to your username. Or, go to the new repository page if all the icons look the same. Give your repository a short, memorable name. Go ahead and make it public just for kicks; why hide your attempt to learn GitHub? GitHub’s signup page.First, you’ll need to sign up for an account on GitHub.com. It’s as simple as signing up for any other social network. Keep the email you picked handy; we’ll be referencing it again soon.You could stop there and GitHub would work fine. But if you want to work on your project on your local computer, you need to have Git installed. In fact, GitHub won’t work on your local computer if you don’t install Git. Install Git for Windows, Mac or Linux as needed. lauren orsini The author’s GitHub page.You may already have a dozen other social media accounts, but here’s why you should be on GitHub anyway: it’s got the best Terms of Service agreement out of the bunch. If you check out Section F of the terms, you’ll see that GitHub does everything in its power to ensure that you retain total ownership of any projects you upload to the site:“We claim no intellectual property rights over the material you provide to the Service. Your profile and materials uploaded remain yours.”What’s more, you can actually use GitHub without knowing ANY code at all. You don’t really need a tutorial to sign up and click around. But I do think that there’s merit to learning things the hard way first, by which I mean, with plain old coding in Git. After all, GitHub just happens to be one of the most effortless graphical interfaces for the Git programming language.What Is Git?Thank famed software developer Linus Torvalds for Git, the software that runs at the heart of GitHub. (And while you’re at it, go ahead thank him for the Linux operating system, too.) Git is version control software, which means it manages changes to a project without overwriting any part of that project. And it’s not going away anytime soon, particularly since Torvalds and his fellow kernel developers employ Git to help develop the core kernel for Linux.Why use something like Git? Say you and a coworker are both updating pages on the same website. You make your changes, save them, and upload them back to the website. So far, so good. The problem comes when your coworker is working on the same page as you at the same time. One of you is about to have your work overwritten and erased.A version control application like Git keeps that from happening. You and your coworker can each upload your revisions to the same page, and Git will save two copies. Later, you can merge your changes together without losing any work along the way. You can even revert to an earlier version at any time, because Git keeps a “snapshot” of every change ever made.The problem with Git is that it’s so ancient that we have to use the command line—or Terminal if you’re a Mac user—in order to access it, typing in snippets of code like ‘90s hackers. This can be a difficult proposition for modern computer users. That’s where GitHub comes in. Creating a new repository on GitHub.Don’t worry about clicking the checkbox next to “Initialize this repository with a README.” A Readme file is usually a text file that explains a bit about the project. But we can make our own Readme file locally for practice.Click the green “Create Repository” button and you’re set. You now have an online space for your project to live in.Creating Your Local RepositorySo we just made a space for your project to live online, but that’s not where you’ll be working on it. The bulk of your work is going to be done on your computer. So we need to actually mirror that repository we just made as a local directory.This—where we do some heavy command line typing—is the part of every Git tutorial that really trips me up, so I’m going to go tediously, intelligence-insultingly slow.First type:mkdir ~/MyProjectmkdir is short for make directory. It’s not actually a Git command, but a general navigational command from the time before visual computer interfaces. The ~/ ensures that we’re building the repository at the top level of your computer’s file structure, instead of stuck inside some other directory that would be hard to find later. Actually, if you type ~/ into your browser window, it’ll bring up your local computer’s top level directory. For me, using Chrome on a Mac, it displays my Users folder.Also, notice that I called it MyProject, the very same name I called my GitHub repository that we made earlier. Keep your name consistent, too.Next, type:cd ~/MyProjectcd stands for change directory, and it’s also a navigational command. We just made a directory, and now we want to switch over to that directory and go inside it. Once we type this command, we are transported inside MyProject.Now we’re finally using a Git command. For your next line, type:git initYou know you’re using a Git command because it always begins with git. init stands for “initialize.” Remember how the previous two commands we typed were general command-line terms? When we type this code in, it tells the computer to recognize this directory as a local Git repository. If you open up the folder, it won’t look any different, because this new Git directory is a hidden file inside the dedicated repository. Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T… Why Your Company’s Tech Transformation Starts W… http://git-scm.com/, where you download Git.Now it’s time to go over to the command line. On Windows, that means starting the Git Bash app you just installed, and on OS X, it’s regular old Terminal. It’s time to introduce yourself to Git. Type in the following code:git config –global user.name “Your Name Here”Of course, you’ll need to replace “Your Name Here” with your own name in quotations. It can be your legal name, your online handle, anything. Git doesn’t care, it just needs to know to whom to credit commits and future projects.Next, tell it your email and make sure it’s the same email you used when you signed up for a GitHub.com account just a moment ago. Do it like this:git config –global user.email “your_email@youremail.com”That’s all you need to do to get started using Git on your computer. However, since you did set up a GitHub.com account, it’s likely you don’t just want to manage your project locally, but also online. If you want you can also set up Git so it doesn’t ask you to log in to your GitHub.com account every time you want to talk to it. For the purposes of this tutorial, it isn’t a big deal since we’ll only be talking to it once. The full tutorial to do this, however, is located on GitHub. How AI is Learning to Play with Wordslast_img read more

How to Get a Pilot Certification for Commercial Drone Use

first_imgImage: Phantom 4 via DJIHobbyist Flight RulesFly at or below 400 feetKeep the UAS (Drone) in visual line-of-sight at all timesKnow the airspace requirements of your locationDaylight-only operations (30 minutes before official sunrise to 30 minutes after official sunset)Do NOT fly near airportsDo NOT fly near other aircraftDo NOT fly over crowds of peopleDo NOT fly over stadiums or sporting eventsDo NOT fly near emergency response effortsDo NOT fly under the influenceDo NOT fly at speeds at or over 100mphNo operations from a moving aircraftNo operations from a moving vehicle, unless the operation is over a sparsely populated areaNo careless or reckless operationsNo carriage of hazardous materialsImage via ShutterstockCommercial Flight and UAS Remote Pilot CertificationIf you intend to sell your aerial photos and footage, you fall under commercial use of an aircraft. While the rules and guidelines are similar to hobbyists, commercial use requires a Small UAS Remote Pilot Certification. Essentially, this is a much lower level of a pilot’s license, similar to a driving permit versus a driver’s license. At around $150 for testing, it’s much cheaper than a pilot’s license too.For those familiar with Section 333 Exemptions, that convoluted process is no longer necessary for drones under 55lbs. If your aircraft weighs more than 55lbs, you will need both a UAS Remote Pilot Certification and a Section 333 Exemption.Image via FAARequirements for UAS Remote Pilot CertificationMust be 16 years of age or olderAble to read, speak, write, and understand EnglishBe in a physical and mental condition to safely operate a small UASMust pass an Aeronautical Knowledge Test at an FAA-approved testing center (every two years)Must undergo a Transportation Safety Administration TSA background security checkFile FAA Form 8710-13 for a remote pilot certificate with a small UAS rating through the Integrated Airman Certification and Rating Application (IACRA) UAS WaiversIf your drone operations don’t meet the new standards, you can apply for a waiver from the FAA. Waivers could permit you to fly at night, beyond visual line-of-sight, or above the 400ft ceiling. The FAA has confirmed that they have already processed 76 waivers within the first days of the new regulations. Processing time depends on the complexity of the request — however, the agency strives to respond within 90 days. You can read more about UAS waivers here.Have you gone through the FAA certification process? Share your experience in the comments below. Fly your drone for commercial use with the FAA’s new Remote Pilot Certificate. Here’s everything you need to know about the new process.Top image via ShutterstockCommercial drone use is now officially FAA official. That’s right, it’s now legal to fly your drone for commercial use in the United States. The Federal Aviation Administration has released the steps to attaining a UAS Remote Pilot Certification as well as any additional commercial waivers.For those solely flying for hobbyist recreation, the pilot certification is not required. However, all pilots must register their Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems with the FAA. All aircraft weighing over 0.55 lbs must be registered and tagged with its registration number. It’s a simple online process that costs $5. If you want to fly outside of the US, or if your aircraft weighs more that 55 lbs, you must use the paper registration form.Hobbyist UAS FlightGIF via FAAIf you have no intention to ever sell your footage or photos, the use of your UAS falls under the hobbyist category. This allows you to fly your aircraft for fun. Hobbyists can still upload and share their footage online to sites like YouTube and Vimeo. For filmmakers wanting to make a short film, they may fall under hobbyist use if there are no financial gains. They must be made not for profit.Hobbyist pilots must be a U.S. Citizen or legal permanent resident over the age of 13.Registering Hobbyist AircraftFor US-based flights with aircraft weighing 0.55-55 lbs (250 grams-25 kilograms), you can register your aircraft online.Go to registermyuas.faa.govClick RegisterCreate an Account (Must be 13 years or older)Select Model AircraftEnter your personal information, click Proceed to CheckoutEnter your payment information for the $5 Fee, click SubmitPrint a copy of your certificate for your recordsWrite the Registration Number on the body of your UAS (Drone) Take the Free FAA Part 107 Course and Aeronautical Knowledge Practice Test (create an FAA account to view)Register and take the Aeronautical Knowledge Test at a Nearby FAA-approved testing facilityPass the 60-question multiple choice Aeronautical Knowledge Test with a minimum score of 70%Complete FAA Form 8710-13 for a Remote Pilot Certificate using the FAA IACRA system.Register with the FAA IACRALogin with username and passwordClick on Start New ApplicationApplication type — PilotCertifications — Remote PilotOther path informationStart application Steps to Pass the Aeronautical Knowledge TestRead and study the following documents:Airman Certification StandardsRemote Pilot Knowledge Test GuideRemote Pilot Small UAS Study GuidePilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical KnowledgePart 107 Advisory CircularAlternatively, you can supplement your studies with the Drone Pilot (UAS) Test Prep App iOS ($39.99) | Android ($49.99) Sign the application electronically and submitWait 6-8 weeks for processingRepeat the test after two years Follow application promptsEnter the 17-digit Knowledge Test Exam IDlast_img read more