Spartans boys down Chico for league win

first_imgRed Bluff >> Valentin Ramirez put up nine points in the opening period for the Spartans Friday night en route to a 61-54 league win over Chico in Red Bluff.After a strong start from Ramirez and teammate Brayden Hutchens, who had seven in the first and four 3s on the night, it was anybody’s game deep into the final frame. The Spartans scored the first 10 points before the Panthers started hitting shots. After one it was 21-12 Red Bluff. The second was a different story.The Panthers went on a …last_img read more

A Day of Passivhaus Immersion in New York City

first_imgAlthough the idea does have a certain appeal, for most of us it would be impractical to tour all of the approximately 40 completed or in-progress Passivhaus projects in New York. But a one-day symposium focused on a selection of these projects would be easily manageable and, it turns out, is already on the calendar.On Saturday, June 23, New York Passive House, a nonprofit based in New York City, will play host to the 2012 Passive House Symposium – a detailed look at nine retrofit projects and nine new-building projects. While some of these projects are in the city (a hotbed of Passivhaus retrofit activity), the locations of others range from Long Island to upstate New York. The configurations include row houses, multifamily projects, and commercial and institutional buildings.The presenters offer an impressive level of expertise – most are architects, many are builders and certified Passive House consultants. All have extensive experience applying the Passivhaus standard in New York’s climate zones.Symposium detailsThe event is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Sciame Auditorium, 141 Convent Avenue, at the City College of New York’s Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. (click here to register). The admission fee – $40 for the public, $20 for NYPH members, $50 at the door – includes lunch and beverages. Building professionals licensed in New York State can earn 5.5 hours of professional education credits by attending the symposium.NYPH has summarized the schedule of events as follows:MORNING SESSIONSPassive House: a global standard: Tomas O’Leary, founder and director of Brooklyn-based Passive House Academy, will describe the latest developments at the Passive House Institute and Passivhaus activities generally in Europe, and how New York fits in in the emergence of the standard.Certified Passive House: Architect Bill Ryall (Ryall Porter Sheridan Architects) and Passive House consultant David White (Right Environments) will present their completed project, Orient Point, a new building on Long Island recently certified by PHI.Project roundtable: Architects Andreas Benzing, Julie Torres Moskovitz, Jeremy Shannon, and Chris Benedict will each explore different aspects of working toward the Passivhaus standard in a variety of projects.Lunch, which will include a showing of Passive Passion, a 20-minute documentary on Passive House, by Brooklyn-based documentary producer-editor Charlie Hoxie. The documentary features (See the trailer here.)AFTERNOON SESSIONSCertified Passive House: Architect Stephanie Bassler (North River Architecture + Planning) will present details about Omega Institute, an upstate institutional new-construction/addition that was certified in fall of 2011.Project Slam: Four PechaKucha 20×20 presentations: Stas Zakrzewski (Z+H Architects): “PH in France, and what construction there can show us here”; Wendy Ing (certified Passivhaus consultant): “Facing thermal bridges in an upstate home”; Ken Levenson (475 High Performance Building Supply): “Row house, multifamily, and country house”; and Chris Steffens (Lightmill Design): “Data collection in PH buildings.”Project roundtable: Architect Sam Bargetz (Loadingdock 5): “Brooklyn projects: variations”; builder Gennaro Brooks-Church (Eco Brooklyn): “Radical sustainability”; and engineer Jordan Goldman (ZeroEnergy Design): “New England PH: commonalities and differences.”PH going forward – projects on the boards: Architect Paul Castrucci (Red Industries) on “ABC NoRio: PH, a tight urban site”; Brooklyn-based Architect Greg Duncan on “Commercial PH in Brooklyn: concerns beyond residential buildings”; and engineer Lois Arena (Steven Winter Associates), who will discuss “The process of PH enclosure assembly in upstate housing.”last_img read more

No positive dope test spells good news

first_imgWith almost two-thirds of the events over in the Commonwealth Games and India adding to the medals tally, one thing which has not been spoken about is dope.Less than a month before the Games began, Indian athletes were in the news for the wrong reasons as almost a dozen of them from various disciplines has tested positive for MHA (Methylhexanamine).Few knew what this stuff was all about since it was added on the list of banned substances by the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA) only in January this year.At home, when wrestlers like Rajiv Tomar, swimmer Richa Mishra and even shot putter Saurabh Vij tested positive for MHA, the feeling was disgusting. The world of sports is made ugly by any form of doping and for the host nation to be caught before the Games was distressing.On Sunday, Commonwealth Games Federation boss Mike Fennell answered questions on dope tests being conducted during the Games.He said approximately 850 random tests have been conducted at the National Dope Testing Laboratory (NDTL), a WADA-accredited lab in the Capital, and 600 results have come out. The surprising part is, not one test has been reported positive.At a time when people are still critical of the Games, and rightly so, because of the ticketing, transportation and food problems for volunteers, people are not aware how the people in the lab are also working overtime.India has a dubious history of sorts in the Commonwealth Games and as far back as 1990 in Auckland, a weightlifter called Subrata Kumar Paul had flunked a dope test.advertisementIndia athletes also shamed the nation during the 2004 Athens Olympics when women weightlifters were caught in tests just before the Games. I was scared that in a sport like weightlifting, the Indians would be under the scanner because of their dubious past.To have been penalised $500,000 by the International Weightlifting Federation was shocking. The Indian body had to virtually beg, borrow and steal before paying a sizeable portion so that India could compete in the Games.Obviously, nobody in India wanted to take a chance with dope and athletes were subjected to stringent testing.However, there was a school of thought which said that a WADA-accredited lab being used for checking athletes was wrong. As the hosts celebrate the rich medal haul, what needs to be highlighted is how the Indians have been fair while competing. At least till now.last_img read more