Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_img TAGS: Edinburgh RugbyLeicester TigersSaracensWorcester Warriors “I’m proud of the effort today. We are getting better, irrespective of who we play.”To watch the weekend’s Aviva Premiership highlights, follow this link Dead-eye Dan: Ospreys outside-half Dan Biggar kicked 100% of his chances to help his team beat Cardiff BluesBy Katie FieldThe SaintsDan-tasticHe kicked 17 of his side’s points in their 22-19 away victory at Cardiff Blues and was Man-of-the-Match – yes, the Ospreys outside-half Dan Biggar had a Christmas cracker of an evening on Friday.Justin Tipuric’s try helped the Ospreys move up the RaboDirect Pro 12 table into fourth spot, just one point behind Leinster.Remarkably, Biggar has not missed a single kick at goal since September. In the ensuing three months he has hit the target 33 times for the Ospreys and twice for Wales, so it’s not only Cardiff who’ve been suffering from the Biggar Blues.Better late than neverOn a weekend of largely low-scoring matches, the stage was set for some last-minute heroics and Stephen Myler and Ronan O’Mahony duly obliged.Myler struck a penalty with the last kick of the game against London Wasps at Adams Park, to steal a 17-15 win for the Saints and allow them to maintain second in the Aviva Premiership table .“We had not beaten them for four seasons so with 30 seconds to go we thought we had done enough,” said disappointed Wasps director of rugby Dai Young.Later on Saturday, Munster were bidding to go into Christmas on a high by beating the Scarlets in Cork, but they were trailing 10-9 in the closing seconds of the match. The mid-table Welsh side must have thought they had an unlikely win over the league leaders sewn up, but they also had two players in the sin-bin and Munster created a try for O’Mahony with the final play of the game to steal the win – just as they had in the Heineken Cup last week.Flying ScotsmenEdinburgh made it five wins from their last seven in all competitions when they defeated Leinster 11-6 at Murrayfield on Friday. They hadn’t beaten the Irish giants since 24 September 2010 and started this season with four losses from their first five RaboDirect Pro 12 games, but a try from wing Dougie Fife and two penalties from Greig Laidlaw were enough to defeat the defending champions.Laidlaw was impressive throughout, cutting through the Leinster defence several times, but Edinburgh flanker Cornell Du Preez was the Man of the Match. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The SinnersToothless TigersLeicester suffered their biggest Premiership defeat of all time, going down 49-10 to Saracens at Allianz Park. There was no Christmas spirit in evidence from Saracens as they ruthlessly took Leicester apart up front and capitalised on their dominance with six tries, including two for Chris Ashton, one each for Jack Wilson, Billy Vunipola and Jackson Wray and a penalty try.At the double: Chris Ashton scored two tries for SaracensLeicester boss Richard Cockerill was critical of some of the officiating, particularly the sin-binning of Graham Kitchener – Saracens scored 15 points while he was off the pitch. However, Cockerill did admit: “Saracens played very well, they deserved to win and their power was the key for them and we couldn’t cope with it. We weren’t good enough.”Washed outHorribly wet and windy weather across much of the British Isles made it extremely difficult for the players to turn on the style this weekend. Excluding the points fest that was Saracens v Leicester, a total of just five tries were scored in the remaining five Aviva Premiership games while in the RaboDirect Pro 12 there were eight tries across the five games.Worst of all, the rain meant Glasgow Warriors’ clash with Benetton Treviso had to be postponed as the Scotstoun pitch was waterlogged.  Ah well, at least it didn’t snow!Ten out of tenWorcester Warriors looked a Christmas gift-horse in the mouth as they allowed Gloucester to stutter their way to a 12-6 victory at Kingsholm. It meant the Warriors have lost their first ten Aviva Premiership matches and will need some kind of miracle to climb out of the relegation spot in 2014.Trailing only 9-6 with half an hour to go, Worcester made things tough for themselves when they lost Richard de Carpentier to the sin-bin. Paul Warwick came within a whisker of scoring a winning try for them, but Henry Trinder stopped him inches short, and the visitors were unable to capitalise on a one-man advantage for the last few minutes after Jonny May was shown a yellow card.The Warriors knew the match against the out-of-sorts Gloucester side presented them with a good chance of breaking their Premiership duck, but they still fell short. However, director of rugby Dean Ryan remains upbeat, saying: “I’m looking forward to the New Year because we’re a different side to what we were eight or nine weeks ago – by a long way. We are a pretty strong group now and we’re looking forward to seeing what comes round the corner. BARNET, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 21: Chris Ashton of Saracens moves past Jordan Crane during the Aviva Premiership match between Saracens and Leicester Tigers at Allianz Park on December 21, 2013 in Barnet, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) last_img read more

Six Nations player analysis: Billy Vunipola, England

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Something rather extraordinary happened at the end of England‘s post-match press conference at Twickenham on Saturday following a bittersweet 55-35 battering of France that showcased some stunning attacking rugby but ultimately meant the hosts took yet another Six Nations runners-up spot.When all the pressing enquiries had been fielded, Andy Farrell stood up. “Can I just say one more thing?” he asked, before answering his own rhetorical question. “I thought Billy Vunipola was outstanding today.”To single out an individual spoke volumes. This was a genuinely epic instalment of Le Crunch. England had scored seven tries against a side that had shipped two over the preceding 320 minutes.Only twice, against Australia in 2010 thanks to a Drew Mitchell hat-trick and against New Zealand in 2007 with Joe Rokocoko and Sitiveni Sivivatu razing Paris to the ground, have Les Bleus conceded more points.Of course, a number of moving parts were needed to produce such a return, so for Farrell to place Vunipola on a pedestal was a reflection of something seriously special from the Saracen.Remarkably, Billy Vunipola had never completed 80 minutes in a Test before England overturned Wales in Cardiff. He played every second of the tournament thereafter, and was superb.Stuart Lancaster defines a world-class performer as one of the top three on the planet in any given position. Courtney Lawes, Dan Cole and Joe Marler can lay claim to the moniker. Chris Robshaw is very close and Jonathan Joseph might be soon.Now fulfilling his monstrous potential, Vunipola is nearing the marker as well. His display on Saturday reinforced as much.Spoiler supremeA feature of Vunipola’s evening was his immense appetite for work. He hunted involvements all game. The law of averages is fairly simple on this – the more times a prodigious talent can figure, the more likely their team is to do well.Many of Vunipola’s contributions were telling, starting here at the opening scrum. He spies that the ball is out and rushes through on Sebastien Tillous-Borde, forcing the Toulon scrum-half to throw a horrible pass into midfield.Not content with that, Vunipola follows the ball to tackle the receiver, Yoann Huget:A closer look at the first intervention shows how the No 8 bides his time before striking:This puts France far behind the gain-line, giving them slow ball against a well-set defence. Jules Plisson chucked a poor pass that Joseph scooped up and Ben Youngs‘ first try resulted.In the second half, Vunipola and James Haskell combined for an outright steal from a France set-piece. Watch how Vunipola latches onto Haskell latter to haul him forward:Domineering defencePhysical statements are valuable at every level of rugby, not least in the early exchanges of a crucial international. For that reason, this maul turnover lifted England hugely:Having lined up France skipper Thierry Dusautoir, the first step is line-speed. Vunipola sprints up, occupying Dusautoir’s peripheral vision:He then wraps up his man, holding him above ground, first alongside Haskell……and then with Cole after Haskell is cleared out by Nicolas Mas:England were on the front foot here, and ended the passage with possession. That said, Vunipola was also excellent when France had the ascendancy and made a mighty 21 tackles overall.Here, he scrambles into shot to take down Huget after the wing cuts back and bumps off Jack Nowell:Notice how Vunipola gets to his feet and competes for the ball. Only a joint clear-out from Yoann Maestri and Bernard Le Roux prevents a steal.Indeed, Vunipola’s decision-making at the breakdown has been a good throughout the Championship. Although Nigel Owens adjudged England to have infringed here for using their hands in a ruck, watch Vunipola make a nuisance of himself.He holds Huget up before demonstrating discipline to roll away:Making playsEngland Under 18 coach John Fletcher used a certain phrase when Vunipola junior was coming through the ranks. In phase-play patterns, the key distributor had to be either “B or B” –  a back or Billy. England’s No 8 has been excellent throughout the Six Nations and was superb again on Saturday as England agonisingly fell short of a sensational title heist. We analyse Billy Vunipola’s performance against France. It is easy to see why. Even now, Vunipola’s handling skills and awareness are significant assets. In this instance, following a fine ruck turnover from Lawes, one long pass puts the ball into space and sets England away:Looking up to see a staggered, disjointed defensive line, Vunipola’s vision is magnificent:His ensuing support play is just as impressive. He tracks the attack but does not rush all the way to the ruck, instead picking a line off Ben Youngs and carrying hard:We will come onto Vunipola’s running game later. Before that, a glance at a set move England used late on. Interestingly, Vunipola is deployed as a playmaker:Starting in the scrum half position, he drops to receive the ball from fellow Saracen Richard Wigglesworth, who has looped around from the front of the lineout:Shaping either to take it himself or send up Billy Twelvetrees on a hard line, Vunipola then pulls back to George Ford:A reverse angle is best to track the opening as it unfolds thanks largely to Vunipola’s pass:Trucking up and scoring triesWeighing over 120 kilograms and possessing fearful leg drive, Vunipola is a wrecking ball in the collision. However his carrying game is more than brainless marauding. This effort from backfield was exemplary:Plenty of attributes shine through here. Initially, Vunipola’s positioning and anticipation ensure he is in the right place for catcher Ben Youngs to find him:Having received the pass and set off, Vunipola steps off his left foot:This is important. Footwork prior to contact is a means of unbalancing the defenders and therefore weakening their posture prior to tackling.It works magnificently, Vunipola tying up three Frenchmen and presenting the ball perfectly for Ben Youngs to whip away after Dylan Hartley and Lawes have resourced the ruck:Vunipola barged over for England’s penultimate try shortly after the hour mark, the score once displaying massive desire as the 22 year-old carries twice in three phases:Dragging himself off the deck for another shunt at the fringe defence following Ben Youngs’ dart, Vunipola got some help from big brother Mako. This must have felt great:Safe handsThe ability to step up when the intensity escalates is what sets apart truly exceptional players. So when Vunipola offered himself to take this short lineout when Tom Youngs was struggling to hit his men……and when he secured this restart as England pressed for what would have been the Championship-clinching six points…center_img On the charge: Billy Vunipola carries at the France defence …a sense of do-as-I-do leadership shone through.A wonderful Six Nations finale has made the Rugby World Cup even more of a delicious prospect. Vunipola, who was surplus to Lancaster’s requirements for the latter part of last autumn,  is sure to be a major protagonist for England.last_img read more

Sale v Wasps live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_img Sale v Wasps live stream: How to watch the Premiership match online from anywhereIt’s fourth v tenth in today’s one Gallagher Premiership fixture as Sale host Wasps at the AJ Bell Stadium (kick-off 3pm).Last year’s finalists Wasps have won only one of their league fixtures so far this season while Sale are in the top four after two wins from three matches.Here are the team line-ups and below we explain how to find a reliable live stream for Sale v Wasps.Sale Sharks: Sam James; Luke James, Roahn Janse van Rensburg, Sam Hill, Marland Yarde; AJ MacGinty, Faf de Klerk (captain); Valerey Morozov, Akker van der Merwe, Coenie Oosthuizen, Matt Postlethwaite, JP du Preez, Cobus Wiese, Tom Curry, Daniel du Preez.Replacements: Curtis Langdon, Ross Harrison, Will-Griff John, James Phillips, Sam Dugdale, Will Cliff, Robert du Preez, Tom Roebuck.Wasps: Lima Sopoaga; Zach Kibirige, Paolo Odogwu, Michael Le Bourgeois, Josh Bassett; Charlie Atkinson, Will Porter; Tom West, Tom Cruse, Kieran Brookes, Will Rowlands, James Gaskell, Ben Morris, Thomas Young (captain), Alfie Barbeary.Replacements: Tommy Taylor, Simon McIntyre, Jeff Toomaga-Allen, Levi Douglas, Tom Willis, Dan Robson, Jimmy Gopperth, Juan de Jongh.How to watch Sale v Wasps from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Sale v Wasps, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Sale v Wasps live stream: How to watch from the UKSale v Wasps, which kicks off at 3pm, will be shown live on BT Sport 1 in the UK. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when Sale v Wasps takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Sale v Wasps live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Sale v Wasps from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 4am early on Monday on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer All you need to know about Sunday’s Gallagher Premiership match High rise: Sale’s Matt Postlethwaite wins a lineout against Wasps (Getty Images) Sale v Wasps live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Sale v Wasps will kick off at 10am EST and 7am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Sale v Wasps live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Fox Sports have the rights to show Premiership matches and you can watch Sale v Wasps in the early hours of Monday at 2am (AEST).If you don’t want a long-term contract, you can also stream games live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offer Sale v Wasps live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, SuperSport shows matches in South Africa.South Africa is one hour ahead of the UK, so Sale v Wasps kicks off at 5pm on SuperSport Variety 2.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. last_img read more

Six Nations Team of Round One

first_img @AlexCorbs was absolutely loving THAT Antoine Dupont offload yesterday! @NBCSports#GuinnessSixNations pic.twitter.com/i7chyog6cV— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 7, 20211. Wyn Jones (Wales)Good skills from Jones, who often found himself at the head of Wales’ attacking pods, where he executed several slick pullbacks throughout the game.Scrummaged well against the awkward Andrew Porter and surely now in the Lions frame.2. George Turner (Scotland)The biggest game of his young career and Turner comfortably outshone opposite number Jamie George in both the loose and the lineout.Red alert: Scotland’s George Turner on the ball against England (SNS Group/Getty Images)Handled nicely for his side’s try. Is he a glimpse of what Harry Thacker could look like playing international rugby? 3. Zander Fagerson (Scotland)Scrums went on so long during the Calcutta Cup clash that it felt as if time stood still. The battle between Ellis Genge and Fagerson was a match-defining clash; Fagerson won.4. Tadhg Beirne (Ireland)The in-form member of Ireland’s best second-row combination since the O’Connell-O’Callaghan axis. His try was harder to score than it looked, and he was an irritant at the breakdown throughout.Close range: Tadhg Beirne scores Ireland’s try against Wales (Getty Images)5. Jonny Gray (Scotland)An absolute menace in the lineout, stopping England in their tracks on their rare forays to the adventurous side of halfway.The cupboard the Lions keep their second-rows in is groaning at the hinges, with Maro Itoje and Alun Wyn Jones also excellent.6. Josh Navidi (Wales)Not a vintage weekend for blindsides, but Navidi’s international return from concussion issues will be welcomed from Cardiff to Caernarfon.No way through: Josh Navidi is tackled by two Ireland players (Getty Images)Coming on for the stricken Dan Lydiate after 12 minutes, he provided a performance full of vibrancy – and a touch of jouissance to set up George North’s try.7. Hamish Watson (Scotland)Hamish Watson never stops spinning, flicking out limbs like the Tasmanian Devil, a rabble-rousing masterclass from the coalface.He’s probably still going now, the human bucking-bronco providing the outstanding back-row performance of the weekend.8. Matt Fagerson (Scotland)Set the tone with a thunderous first carry. Constantly offered an option and was impressive in kick return. Could he be Scotland’s first settled No 8 option in what feels like decades?Who would make your Six Nations Team of Round One? Email [email protected] to let us know. Worth the wait! Scotland are the winners of the 2021 #CalcuttaCup #GuinnessSixNations #ENGvSCO pic.twitter.com/HXIv5YrLtk— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 6, 202111. Duhan van der Merwe (Scotland)Scotland should have triumphed by a greater margin, but van der Merwe’s try ended up being the match-winner. Could have had a double, but the one he managed to finish was special, burrowing his way through five bodies like a wriggling lamprey.10. Matthieu Jalibert (France)It would be an easy call to select Finn Russell, but a yellow card and a few missed kicks could have cost Scotland dear.Bag of tricks: Matthieu Jalibert was a creative influence for France at ten (Getty Images)Jalibert’s the pick here, a consummate performance from the out-half ensuring that Romain Ntamack was not missed. Indeed, he may even be the more imaginative option.9. Antoine Dupont (France)The crown prince of French rugby with another regal display. Provided assists for four tries and finished another himself, with his pinpoint poke-through for Teddy Thomas the pick of them all. “But the French, wow.” A lovely try from Teddy Thomas after a Jailbert break and a Dupont assist. #GuinnessSixNations #ITAvFRA pic.twitter.com/M61hXQyKTM— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 6, 2021Luca Sperandio’s try is also worth mentioning in dispatches.13. George North (Wales)If North and the Welsh 13 jersey were on Facebook their relationship status would be ‘it’s complicated’. On Sunday they shared a beautiful day, with North powerfully finishing Wales’ first try and firing a bullet pass for their second.12. Cameron Redpath (Scotland)Made Owen Farrell look like the panicked rookie. Full of good decisions in the face of aggressive defence, and showed he was physically ready with a few brave carries off the lineout. What a playmaking axis Gregor Townsend has at his disposal now. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img Who makes Jacob Whitehead’s composite team from the opening weekend of championship fixtures? Six Nations Team of Round One  We had Rome in the sun, Twickenham in the rain and Cardiff in the cold – three intriguing games to open the 2021 Six Nations. Far more entertaining than last autumn’s offerings (well, unless you’re English), the tournament already seems wide open.These next few weeks will decide more than a winning nation – players from four of the teams are competing for places in the British & Irish Lions squad (wherever that tour may be!).So, if we were cobbling together a dream team from this weekend’s matches, who’d make the cut?Six Nations Team of Round One15. Stuart Hogg (Scotland)Has a game ever been run from full-back before? Playing like prime Percy Montgomery, this was Hogg’s best performance as Scotland captain, showcasing his kicking, leadership and tactical nous.Hugo Keenan was also very impressive for Ireland.14. Teddy Thomas (France)Thomas just loves scoring right now. Beautiful interplay with Antoine Dupont throughout, and now adding a poacher’s instinct to his transcendent athleticism. Leading man: Stuart Hogg celebrates Scotland’s Calcutta Cup win (Offside/Getty Images) last_img read more

La Iglesia Episcopal Dominicana celebra crecimiento y aniversarios

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab El obispo Julio C. Holguín presidió la eucaristía y predicó durante un oficio el 14 de abril en que la Diócesis Episcopal de la República Dominicana celebró su crecimiento y sus aniversarios. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Santo Domingo, República Dominicana] La Iglesia Episcopal Dominicana celebró su crecimiento, así como 116 años de existencia y 100 años en la Iglesia Episcopal durante un oficio eucarístico el 14 de abril en la ciudad de Santo Domingo.El obispo Julio C. Holguín presidió la celebración y predicó durante la festiva eucaristía de tres horas de duración que sirvió de clausura a una conferencia de tres días con este lema: “Juntos podemos: Encuentro en Misión con Iglepidom” [la sigla de Iglesia Episcopal Dominicana].En su sermón, Holguín habló acerca de “la Gran Comisión” y el deber de todos los bautizados de participar en la misión, así como de la responsabilidad de los episcopales de compartir con otros lo que Dios ha hecho en sus vidas, de manera que otros puedan creer.Estudiantes en representación de una docena de escuelas episcopales asistieron a la eucaristía del 14 de abril en Santo Domingo. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.Más de 2.000 personas asistieron a la eucaristía —entre ellas 70 estadounidenses en relaciones de compañerismo con la diócesis— que se celebró en un pabellón de volibol de un complejo deportivo del gobierno. Centenares de jóvenes representaron a alrededor de una docena de las 27 escuelas de la diócesis, con bandas de redoblantes y cuerpos de banderas.“Esta es una de las mayores celebraciones que hemos tenido este año y hemos estado preparándonos un año entero para esto”, dijo el Rdo. Adolfo Moronta, vicario de San Pablo y San Lucas, en San Isidro, donde su congregación de 50 a 60 personas está comenzando el proceso de construir una iglesia. “[Es importante] porque durante este tiempo hemos predicado el Evangelio de Jesús a través de todo nuestro país y nuestra Iglesia crece y crece, y éste es un modo de celebrar lo que Dios ha estado haciendo en el pueblo de la República Dominicana”.La diócesis ha crecido en un 20 por ciento en los últimos 10 años, y en 20 años ha disminuido su dependencia de la Iglesia Episcopal [en Estados Unidos] de un 84 por ciento a un 18 por ciento, mientras su presupuesto se ha quintuplicado, explicó el obispo Holguín en una entrevista con ENS después del oficio.“Lo primero es que hemos asumido la responsabilidad y lo segundo es evangelizar; sabemos que la Iglesia necesita expandirse”, dijo Holguín, añadiendo que el clero y el laicado también han emprendido una revitalización espiritual y “gracias a eso, la Iglesia ha comenzado a crecer”.Holguín mencionó, específicamente, a la Ofrenda Unida de Acción de Gracias y al Grupo Dominicano de Desarrollo, que se creó en 1998 para asistir a la diócesis en el desarrollo y en su camino hacia el autosostén. Holguín también reconoció a varios “grandes” misioneros que trabajaron arduamente por la Iglesia a través de los años, y a las relaciones de diócesis compañeras que se fueron creando a lo largo del tiempo, dándoles crédito por ayudar a la diócesis a crecer.La diócesis tiene relaciones de compañerismo con diócesis en Estados Unidos, entre ellas Carolina Oriental, Michigan Oriental, Michigan, Michigan Occidental, Georgia, Nebraska, Texas Noroccidental, Carolina del Sur, Florida Sudoccidental y Luisiana Occidental. La mayoría, si no todas ellas, estuvieron representadas en el encuentro.“Siento que él [el obispo durante su sermón] lo resumió todo a vivir el Pacto Bautismal y a tener ese compromiso [con la misión]”, dijo Rebecca Gibson, de la iglesia episcopal de Cristo [Christ Episcopal Church] en Winchester, Virginia. “Y lo vinculó muy bien con el encuentro”.Walt Dark, Joanne Sutton y Mary Smith, miembros de la iglesia episcopal de la Transfiguración en Indian River, dan palmadas durante una presentación de alabanza y danza en la catedral episcopal de la Epifanía en Santo Domingo el 13 de abril. Foto de Lynette Wilson para ENS.Cerca de 200 personas participaron en el encuentro de tres días de duración, que incluyó talleres que abarcaron todo lo concerniente a la Escuela Bíblica de Vacaciones; el Grupo Dominicano de Desarrollo; construcción; salud, educación y ministerios sociales; programas de microcréditos; y liturgia y espiritualidad. El encuentro, que tuvo lugar en la catedral de la Epifanía, también incluyó música, danza y un diálogo abierto para discutir lo que los participantes habían aprendido en los talleres.“Los talleres eran para mostrar lo que hemos hecho en 116 años”, dijo el Rdo. P. Vicente Peña, vicario de San Juan Bautista en Bonao, en el centro del país.Desde 1991, el número de iglesias ha crecido de 24 a más de 70 misiones y estaciones de predicación, entre ellas 17 templos de 13 que había entonces; el número de escuelas ha aumentado de 7 a 27, según estadísticas del Grupo Dominicano de Desarrollo.“He venido aquí durante cuatro años como parte de un equipo de construcción y nunca había podido abarcar la misión total de la diócesis”, dijo Bob Hills, miembro de la iglesia del Redentor [Church of the Redeemer] en Sarasota, en la Diócesis de Florida Sudoccidental [o del Suroeste de la Florida]. “Por primera vez percibo la totalidad de la misión. Estoy muy impresionado por lo que pasa aquí y orgulloso de formar parte de ello”.La Iglesia Episcopal de la República Dominicana es una de las siete diócesis de la IX Provincia, la cual se extiende a través del Caribe, América Central y el norte de América del Sur, y es una de las diócesis de más rápido crecimiento en la Iglesia Episcopal.“Es una gran alegría para mí estar aquí y experimentar esta maravillosa reunión”, dijo el obispo Wilfrido Ramos-Orench, funcionario encargado de asociaciones globales de la Iglesia Episcopal para la IX Provincia, durante el encuentro.“Siempre creo que Dios nos invita a ser soñadores y a soñar en grande. Uno de mis sueños es que cada una de nuestras diócesis en la IX Provincia se encamine hacia el pleno desarrollo como la de República Dominicana. Es la diócesis insignia en nuestra región, y avanza lentamente hacia la autosuficiencia y la plenitud en Cristo”.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Por Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 16, 2013 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY La Iglesia Episcopal Dominicana celebra crecimiento y aniversarios Millares asisten a una festiva eucaristía Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Church in Egypt grateful for support in its mission

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion, Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Bellah ZuluPosted Jan 13, 2014 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Church in Egypt grateful for support in its mission An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Middle East Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa has expressed its gratitude to the many Christians in Egypt and around the world for their monetary and material support towards helping the “poorest of the poor.”This was contained in a report compiled to account for the first disbursement of the more than US$80,000 raised following a Special Appeal for Egypt to help the poor as well as to help build capacity for young adults in Egypt.“I would like to thank you so much for all your support during last year,” said Bishop Mouneer Anis, who launched the appeal. “With your support, we were able to help many people, especially during the hard times which Egypt is going through.”The last few months have been traumatic for Egyptians after they witnessed much bloodshed and vandalism on their streets. Last year saw the destruction of churches and government buildings.Anglican, Roman Catholic and Coptic churches, as well as Christian schools, were burned down during the attacks in August last year. Despite efforts to restore peace, there is still a lack of security on the streets and the economy continues to decline.The money raised was used mainly for food packages for disadvantaged Egyptian and Sudanese families, school fees and supplies for orphans and vulnerable children as well as for medical assistance.A seven-year old Egyptian boy, Magdy, said he was grateful for the school bag he was given. “Yesterday I had a dream that I had a bag. It is the same bag that I was given at church. I asked my dad for a bag for school and he told me God will send it.”Khawaja Muhammad, a Muslim from Sudan who is now living in Egypt said, “My husband is in Sudan. We have a family of four and I thank God that the Church is interested in helping us.”She added: “I was always so preoccupied on what I would do and how I would provide for my family [thanks to the help received] I had the first joyous morning in a long time.”The Anglican Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa serves all people regardless of religion or race, especially the disadvantaged and marginalized, through educational, medical, and community development ministries. Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Press Release Servicelast_img read more

La mission Navajo trouve des terres fertiles pour un projet…

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Les jardins potagers gaufrés sont l’une des techniques pour économiser l’eau, utilisée par la mission Good Shepherd de Fort Defiance (Arizona) pour le ministère agricole qu’elle développe avec l’aide d’une subvention d’UTO. Photo : Good Shepherd Mission[Episcopal News Service] L’Arizona peut paraître le dernier endroit où trouver un projet agricole dynamique mais les travaux en cours dans la zone de mission de Navajoland réunissent les conditions historiques, culturelles, traditionnelles, écologiques et spirituelles pour implanter un ministère local avec un potentiel quasiment illimité pour une petite congrégation épiscopale.Le jardinage se porte bien depuis des décennies à la mission Good Shepherd de Fort Defiance (État d’Arizona). Les dirigeants locaux recherchent à présent les moyens d’accroître leurs efforts tout en mettant l’accent sur la préservation, en particulier de l’eau. Les traditions amérindiennes et les enseignements épiscopaux se recouvrent sur ce point, à savoir l’importance de protéger la terre et les ressources que Dieu nous a données, déclare la Révérende Cynthia Hizer, vicaire de Good Shepherd.« Les peuples autochtones sont depuis toujours des écologistes », explique Cynthia Hizer. « Leur manière d’appréhender le monde honore la création ».La toute dernière initiative pour cultiver ces sols fertiles est le projet de préservation de l’eau « Protecting the Precious » de la mission Good Shepherd, qui installe cette semaine un système de collecte des eaux de pluies pour accroître l’exploitation agricole de la congrégation. Un autre volet du projet sera d’enseigner les techniques agricoles pour économiser l’eau aux apprentis agriculteurs de la réserve navajo.La mission Good Shepherd se concentre sur le maïs bleu dont le pollen joue également un rôle dans les cérémonies traditionnelles navajo. Photo : Good Shepherd Mission/Facebook« L’eau est un tel problème dans l’Ouest, » explique Margaret Putnam, chef jardinier de Good Shepherd. Le jardin potager de 2 000 m2 de la mission utilise un système d’irrigation au goutte-à-goutte alimenté par l’eau municipale, mais la congrégation espère cultiver un champ entier sur une autre parcelle de 2 000 m2 grâce aux eaux de pluie qu’elle récupère.La préservation est en elle-même un objectif du projet, ajoute Margaret Putnam. Utiliser moins d’eau municipale est ce qu’il faut faire, particulièrement dans un climat sec comme l’Arizona.La collecte des eaux de pluie à Good Shepherd est financée par une subvention de 41 500 dollars de la part du programme United Thank Offering (UTO) de l’Église épiscopale. Dans la demande de subvention, il est fait remarquer que la région désertique a une longue tradition d’agriculture et de pâturage mais ces traditions ont diminué au fil des décennies, en partie du fait de la détérioration de l’environnement.Un cas récent particulièrement choquant et dévastateur a été le déversement accidentel de produits chimiques toxiques dans le fleuve Animas par une ancienne mine du Colorado en août 2015. La pollution créée par ce déversement est parvenue jusqu’au fleuve San Juan, l’une de sources d’eau de l’exploitation agricole St Christopher de Navajoland à Bluff (État d’Utah) et certaines des cultures de la mission ont été anéanties.Depuis lors, St Christopher a décidé d’exploiter un puits artésien pour une partie de l’irrigation de ses cultures afin de ne plus dépendre uniquement du fleuve, explique le Révérend Leon Sampson, diacre.La demande de subvention « Protecting the Precious » fait également remarquer que des décennies d’exploitation minière ont fait baisser la nappe phréatique dans la réserve et contaminé la majeure partie de l’eau restante. L’appauvrissement en nutriments, l’érosion et l’utilisation de pesticides sont d’autres facteurs qui posent des défis aux exploitants agricoles navajo.La solution proposée par le projet de préservation de l’eau à Good Shepherd démarre sur une petite échelle mais a un fort potentiel de croissance car la congrégation montre l’exemple et enseigne la préservation aux autres.« Cela nous enthousiasme de penser que ceux qui participent à cette initiative vont approfondir leur respect vis-à-vis de la terre » est-il écrit dans la demande de subvention de Navajoland. « Protecting the Precious peut transformer notre interaction avec le monde naturel ».Navajoland est un ensemble de missions épiscopales de l’Arizona, du Nouveau-Mexique et de l’Utah qui sont au service des 250 000 personnes qui habitent dans la réserve navajo sur quelque 70 000 kilomètres carrés. Techniquement, les missions ne forment pas un diocèse parce qu’elles poursuivent encore leurs efforts pour devenir financièrement autonomes. Environ 43 % de la population navajo vit sous le seuil de pauvreté si bien que les dirigeants de l’Église épiscopale voient l’entreprenariat comme le moyen d’atteindre leur objectif d’autosuffisance et de permettre à d’autres de sortir de la pauvreté.Une exploitation apicole est en train de prendre forme à Good Shepherd et à St Christopher. Les missions travaillent ensemble pour transformer la production de farine de maïs bleu en entreprise artisanale. Et l’activité de savons artisanaux de Good Shepherd est en plein essor.Cette croissance est en grande partie due à Cynthia Hizer qui est arrivée au début de l’an dernier et vient d’être nommée chanoine pour le développement et l’entreprenariat social dans l’équipe de l’Évêque David Bailey de Navajoland.« Je suis venue avec une passion », confie Cynthia Hizer, qui a précédemment servi dans le diocèse d’Atlanta et y a supervisé un jardin.Plantation de tournesols dans le jardin de la mission Good Shepherd. Photo : Good Shepherd Mission/FacebookMargaret Putnam avait travaillé avec Cynthia Hizer en tant que jardinier de l’église à Atlanta et les deux femmes ont été recrutées à Good Shepherd en raison de leur expertise. Partageant une passion pour l’agriculture, Cynthia Hizer et Margaret Putnam ont apporté avec elles la connaissance de différentes techniques de culture, dont certaines sont employées à Good Shepherd.Une méthode efficace pour préserver l’eau est de créer un jardin potager gaufré : la parcelle de jardin est divisée en petits carrés – comme une gaufre géante – en faisant remonter la terre de sorte que l’eau soit recueillie au fond de chaque carré et ne s’écoule pas.Les bermes surélevées et les creux qui servent à retenir l’eau de pluie peuvent également servir à retenir et diriger l’eau de pluie.« Il y a de l’eau » explique Cynthia Hizer. « Il faut simplement l’avoir au bon endroit et ne pas la laisser dévaler ».Mais ces techniques de préservation ne récupèrent que l’eau de pluie qui tombe sur ou à côté du jardin de 2 000 m2, gaspillant toute l’eau qui tombe ailleurs. Grâce à la subvention d’UTO, Good Shepherd va commencer à récupérer les eaux de pluie qui tombent sur trois des 12 bâtiments de la mission, particulièrement durant la saison des pluies de fin juin à début septembre et les acheminer vers des réservoirs pouvant contenir des milliers de litres d’eau qui peuvent ensuite servir à irriguer les cultures.Une plus grande quantité d’eau va permettre à Good Shepherd de doubler sa capacité de culture en ajoutant un champ de 2 000 m2 à ses parcelles de jardin potager, explique Margaret Putnam.Le jardin est déjà socialement un point de référence pour la congrégation. Les heures qui suivent le service dominical se prêtent particulièrement bien au travail de la terre par les membres de la paroisse, poursuit Cynthia Hizer. Après la pause-café, certains se dirigent vers les parcelles de jardin et plantent ou cueillent les légumes et peuvent discuter des recettes traditionnelles des Navajo qu’ils emploieront pour cuisiner la récolte fraîchement cueillie.Par le passé, était cultivé dans le jardin potager un vaste éventail de légumes que la congrégation préparait et servait ou vendait au marché local. Cette année, tout en cultivant encore des courges, des haricots et des tournesols, le principal objectif est le maïs bleu car Good Shepherd collabore avec St Christopher à un projet financé par l’UTO pour créer une marque et commercialiser le maïs bleu en le vendant en tant que farine.L’agriculture est un passe-temps qui remonte à des générations. Maggie Brown, gardienne de Good Shepherd, cultive un peu de maïs sur son terrain, tout comme son père le faisait avant elle. Certaines parties des récoltes, comme le pollen du maïs bleu, jouent également un rôle dans les cérémonies traditionnelles des Navajo, explique-t-elle.Maggie Brown considère le travail agricole comme une occasion de rayonnement pour la mission.« Travailler dans les champs nous donne la possibilité d’échanger avec la congrégation et toute personne qui vient aider », poursuit-elle.Leon Sampson, le diacre de St Christopher, a joué un rôle essentiel dans la création et le développement de l’exploitation connue sous le nom de Homer Dale Community Farm, tout d’abord en tant que responsable de l’exploitation et ultérieurement en tant que diacre. Son travail agricole a un côté très spirituel, intégrant la prière et faisant preuve d’humilité. Il considère l’exploitation agricole de la mission comme un moyen de combler l’écart entre les seniors qui ont grandi à la ferme et les jeunes qui ont perdu le lien avec la terre.« Nous avons créé un espace pour enseigner à la nouvelle génération » explique Leon Sampson.Un enfant a parlé à Sampson de sa ferme chez lui et lui a dit qu’il y avait des zombies qui avaient mangé les oignons. Leon Sampson s’est alors rendu compte que l’enfant parlait d’un jeu vidéo. « Nos zombies s’appellent des tamias et des lapins », a-t-il dit-il au jeune garçon, avant de lui faire part de ses expériences dans la vraie vie, en matière de jardinage et de foi.« En fait, l’exploitation agricole s’est développée dans le spiritualité et la communauté » explique-t-il.La mission Good Shepherd est à proximité du siège du gouvernement tribal de Window Rock en Arizona et Cynthia Hizer envisage d’établir un partenariat avec les autorités tribales pour enseigner aux habitants de la réserve les techniques agricoles. Elle pense également à une émission de cuisine du style de celle de la chaîne télévisée Food Network où seraient données des recettes qui utilisent des ingrédients familiers aux Navajo.Pour le moment, elle et toute la congrégation de Good Shepherd ont beaucoup à faire, à mesure que l’expansion de leur ministère agricole prend racine.« Chaque petite réussite, nous permet de nous développer un petit peu plus », conclut-elle.– David Paulsen est un rédacteur indépendant basé à Milwaukee (Wisconsin) et membre de Trinity Episcopal Church de Wauwatosa. Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Navajoland, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Church-Community Agriculture, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA La mission Navajo trouve des terres fertiles pour un projet de protection de l’eau « Protecting the Precious » [Protéger ce qui est précieux] est le tout dernier projet axé sur l’agriculture à Navajoland Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA de David PaulsenPosted Sep 30, 2016 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA United Thank Offering Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

Presiding Bishop’s visit strengthens link between Episcopal, Hong Kong Anglican…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Lynette Wilson Posted Mar 2, 2017 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry receives communion from Archbishop Paul Kwong during a Feb. 19 Eucharist at St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong. Photo: Tsang-Hing Ho/ECHO, HKSKH[Episcopal News Service – Hong Kong] On Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s first official visit to the Anglican Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui, he discovered that the Christian church in Hong Kong and the rest of Asia is growing, and it reinforced his belief that relationships centered in the gospel are essential to missional partnerships.“Christianity is growing here, Anglicanism is growing here in Hong Kong. … Hong Kong is a critical relationship in being in real relationship with Asia, and it’s clearly a relationship of equals and that becomes a model or a template for other relationships as well,” said Curry.The Most Rev. Paul Kwong, archbishop of the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui, presided and Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preached, during a Feb. 19 Eucharist at St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong. Photo: Tsang-Hing Ho/ECHO, HKSKH“The archbishop [Paul Kwong] is a leader in the Anglican Communion … a real statesmen, both in Asia and around the Communion,” said Curry. “Hong Kong represents, in many respects, the Anglican way of being in relationship and partnership having agreement on essentials, but creating space for disagreement on matters that are nonessential to the gospel itself.”Curry spent two days in Hong Kong; the second stop on his first official visit as presiding bishop and primate to Asia and Southeast Asia that also included the Philippines, China and Taiwan.Peter Ng, the Episcopal Church’s officer for Asia and the Pacific, now retired; the Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop for ministry beyond the Episcopal Church; the Rev. David Copley, director of global partnerships and mission personnel; Neva Rae Fox, the church’s public affairs officer; and Sharon Jones, executive assistant to the presiding bishop, accompanied Curry.It was Hong Kong, said Robertson, that set the example for becoming an independent province outside colonial rule. “And they quickly became a leader,” he said.Lord Mayor of London Andrew Parmley gave the second reading during the Feb. 19 Eucharist at St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong. Photo: Tsang-Hing Ho ECHO, HKSKHHong Kong, which became a special administrative region governed by China in 1997, was a longtime British colony. The first colonial chaplain was appointed in 1843. The Diocese of Victoria was created in 1849 and later became part of the first national church organization in China. In 1951, following the formation of the People’s Republic of China, the then-Diocese of Hong Kong and Macau became a detached diocese. It became an independent Anglican province in 1998.Its partnership with the Episcopal Church dates to the 1940s and ’50s, said the Most Rev. Paul Kwong, archbishop of the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui, in a Feb. 20 interview with Episcopal News Service.The partnership has included companion diocese relationships, and the Episcopal Church helped to build churches in Hong Kong and Macau in the early years, he said.“So, we’ve had that link for a long time,” he said.The presiding bishop’s visit, Kwong said, was significant in that it served to strengthen the link between the Hong Kong Anglican Church and the Episcopal Church.But the presiding bishop’s visit also was significant in that Curry is new to his primacy and it brought together two primates, said Kwong, who in was elected chair of the Anglican Consultative Council in April 2016.“Over the years, the Communion has been deeply divided and impaired by some contentious issues, and the Episcopal Church has been at the center these arguments and division,” said Kwong, referring to the 2003 ordination and consecration of now retired New Hampshire Bishop V. Gene Robinson as the first openly gay bishop in the Episcopal Church and 78th General Convention’s canonical and liturgical changes in 2015 to provide marriage equality for Episcopalians.“His visit has allowed us to share and learn from each other and also understand our own situation because we are in different contexts. [The Communion] has spent too much time trying to resolve these problems.”It’s time, said the archbishop, to shift focus to mission and to ask, “What is the Communion for? How can we make our communion relevant in our own contexts and to the world at large?“After all, we are brothers in Christ, and we are called to serve the people.”Curry’s message, rooted in what he calls the “Jesus Movement,” underscores the Episcopal Church’s focus on mission partnerships, Kwong added.The Most Rev. Paul Kwong, archbishop of the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui, and the Most Rev. Michael Curry, presiding bishop and primate of the Episcopal Church, process into St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong on Feb. 19. Photo: Tsang-Hing Ho/ ECHO, HKSKH“His message has demonstrated very clearly that the Episcopal Church has a very strong sense of mission and evangelism, and homosexuality isn’t the only issue the church has to address, even though it’s a very serious issue that no one should ignore. … The message about the Jesus Movement and reconciliation is very significant to the communion.“In his sermon yesterday in the cathedral he passionately indicated that God has a dream for every one of us, every church and particularly for the communion. I’m sure that God’s dream is for us to reconcile to each other and that we should work together in unity for the common good.“Because over the years we have spent too much time and energy and effort trying to resolve our differences, and I think it’s time that we sit together and talk about our common good.”It was clear, said Curry, in a later interview with Episcopal News Service, that Kwong is a “bridge builder,” and Robertson added that “Hong Kong, in many ways, represents the Anglican Way of being in partnership.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preached to a full house at St. John’s Cathedral in Hong Kong on Feb. 19. Photo: Tsang-Hing Ho/ECHO, HKSKHCurry brought his fiery Jesus Movement message to a standing-room-only crowd that overflowed into the courtyard of St. John’s Cathedral in the heart of Hong Kong’s central business district.“Hold fast to dreams because life without a dream is like a bird that cannot fly,” said Curry during his Feb. 19 sermon, invoking a poem by Langston Hughes. “God has a dream, and our lives are meant to be lived in harmony with God’s dream.”It was a message that David Xia, who studied Anglicanism in England, traveled more than three hours from Shenzhen, across the border with mainland China, to hear. A message that he said impressed him because of the presiding bishop’s passion and his humility.“It was quite a great honor to have the presiding bishop with us this morning,” said the Very Rev. Matthias C. Der, the dean of St. John’s Cathedral. “It has strengthened the relationship between Hong Kong and the Episcopal Church. And the presiding bishop gave a very inspiriting sermon this morning followed by spontaneous applause; I’m sure his preaching will continue to nurture us into the future.”Following the Feb. 19 Eucharist, Der gave a presentation about the Province of Hong Kong’s history and ministry to the presiding bishop and his staff.The Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui includes the dioceses of Hong Kong Island, Eastern Kowloon, Western Kowloon and the Missionary Area of Macau. Some 30,000 people worship in about 40 congregations and mission points, served by more than 70 clergy members. The province operates social service ministries, including its prison ministry, mental health and elder care ministries, its mission for migrant workers and its program to assist domestic workers.Many migrant workers from Indonesia and the Philippines work as domestics in Hong Kong.  Many Filipinas, from the Episcopal Church in the Philippines, the Philippine Independent Church and the Roman Catholic Church, worship at St. John’s Cathedral, which holds eight weekend services in four languages – English, Mandarin, Cantonese and Tagalog — for more than 2,000 people, 65 percent of them from the Philippines.The Province of Hong Kong has grown 40 percent over the last decade and has 50 parishes, 140 schools and 400 social service units across Hong Kong and Macau, said Der.Click here to watch a video of the presiding bishop preaching at St. John’s Cathedral on Feb. 19.-Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Presiding Bishop’s visit strengthens link between Episcopal, Hong Kong Anglican churches An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Episcopalians, tell us your solar eclipse plans and share your…

first_img Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Posted Aug 18, 2017 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 19, 2017 at 5:19 pm I am trying to find a way to make a video, without going blind. Ronald Davin says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal News Service] Has solar eclipse fever struck your Episcopal congregation? We want to hear about it.A rare total solar eclipse will pass across the continental United States on Aug. 21, potentially offering an awe-inspiring display along its narrow path, from Oregon to South Carolina and 10 other states. But even communities who aren’t in the path of “totality” will get to see the partial eclipse as long as skies are clear.Numerous Episcopal dioceses, congregations and institutions are advertising solar eclipse viewing parties. If your church is hosting a gathering on Aug. 21, email [email protected] so we’ll know to follow up with you after the eclipse. And we’re encouraging Episcopalians to share their experiences on social media with the hashtag #episcopaleclipse.You can get more info on the solar eclipse, including a caution about proper eye protection, at NASA’s eclipse page. Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Catherine Cheek says: Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY Comments (2) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC August 21, 2017 at 3:54 pm Dud, disappointment, occupied 15 minutes of my time, like most sermons., Episcopalians, tell us your solar eclipse plans and share your stories Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Church, wider culture continue to address sexual harassment, abuse in…

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA From left, Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe, Central Pennsylvania Bishop Audrey Scanlan, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Olympia Bishop Greg Rickel and House of Bishops Vice President and El Camino Real Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves pray July 4 during the House of Bishops’ “Liturgy of Listening” session at General Convention in Austin, Texas. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Sexual misconduct and harassment include more than stranger or acquaintance rape and physical abuse. In some instances, inappropriate touching, an unwanted kiss on the cheek, an awkward embrace or a hand placed too low on a woman’s back are more obvious forms of sexual harassment.Other forms are less obvious, more insidious: commenting on a woman’s appearance; inviting a woman into one’s office on the pretext of a meeting, when really, the intention is of a sexual nature; referring to women and girls as “baby,” “honey” or “sweetheart”; talking over women and deferring to men in meetings; the enduring gender pay gap.Or, common forms women clergy confront in The Episcopal Church, such as being told, “You’re too young to be a priest,” or “You’re too pretty to be a priest.”In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal that rocked Hollywood and led to the downfall of powerful men across industries and professions, The Episcopal Church began in January 2018 its own examination of ingrained behaviors, practices and policies affecting women.One year and one General Convention later, Resolution D034, establishing a three-year suspension on the statute of limitations for sexual misconduct committed by clergy against an adult, became effective Jan. 1.“A three-year suspension, that’s huge,” said House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, in an interview with Episcopal News Service. “We are suspending the statute of limitations because we want to hear your voice.”Resolution D034 was one of 24 resolutions addressing sexual harassment, abuse, sexism, inequality and discrimination submitted by the Special Committee on Sexual Harassment and Exploitation; a 49-member, female-only committee appointed by Jennings.As a result of the special committee’s legislative work, Jennings said, three task forces emerged from convention: on Women, Truth and Reconciliation; to Develop Model Sexual Harassment Policies & Safe Church Training; and to Study Sexism in The Episcopal Church & Develop Anti-Sexism Training.“I don’t think this would have happened, frankly, if that special committee had not brought pressure to bear,” said Jennings. “If you look at the report … all of the resolutions that were put in, they were wildly successful.“These issues have only become more urgent since convention.”General Convention’s actions came after a series of steps taken by The Episcopal Church’s leaders.In January 2018, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Jennings issued a call to the church to examine its historical failures to protect victims of sexual harassment, exploitation and abuse. The letter, which came four months after the Harvey Weinstein scandal broke, marked the beginning of the church’s wrangling with its own harassment issues. (The Chicago Tribune offers a timeline of the #MeToo movements.)In February, Jennings appointed the special committee. Then in May, Episcopal Church bishops invited reflections from those hurt by the church. Twelve of the 40 stories the bishops received formed the basis for a “Liturgy of Listening” on July 4 during the 79th General Convention.During convention, the House of Bishops took another step and adopted a covenant in response to abuse and exploitation.In late September, 328 Episcopal clergy women signed on to a letter published in the New York Times that raised concerns about Episcopal priest and former U.S. Sen. John Danforth’s defense of then-U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Sexual assault allegations by Christine Blasey Ford, a psychologist and professor, and two other women against Kavanaugh brought the justice’s confirmation into question and triggered traumatic memories for many women.Ford accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were both teenagers. Ford’s credibility was attacked. The hearings also laid bare male attitudes toward women and sexual assault accusations.The U.S. Senate confirmed Kavanaugh’s appointment to the Supreme Court on Oct. 6, in a 50-48 vote. Two days later, the Christian Century published a piece by Jennings that addressed the church’s response to sexual assault survivors.During the Kavanaugh hearings, Ford’s credibility was tested, as many, mostly men, wondered why she’d kept silent for 30 years. In her piece, Jennings offered an explanation of women’s silence.“Our silence originates in the Bible, where women are largely anonymous, treated as property, used as sexual slaves, and demeaned by men as heroic as David and as divine as Jesus. Women who are called by name account for no more than 8 percent of the people in the Bible, and fewer than 50 of those actually speak,” she wrote.Feminist and womanist scholars, including the Rev. Wil Gafney, an Episcopal priest and Hebrew Bible professor, have pointed out that rape is normative in the Bible, wrote Jennings, from Pharaoh, Amnon, the men of Gibeah and even God.“These stories — of men who rape and abuse and of women who stay silent — are part of the faith tradition that girls and women absorb while sitting in the pews of our churches each week,” Jennings wrote. “They have permeated our culture and shaped our expectations about how men ought to behave toward women and how women ought to respond. So when a woman gathers her courage to speak — to object to being treated like women in the Bible are treated — we should not be surprised when Christian men belittle and ignore her, just as the heroes of their faith have done in stories passed down for millennia.”By publicly sharing her story, Ford gave other women the courage to speak up, as well, including women across the church who reached out to clergy and laity for support. And over the triennium, The Episcopal Church will address harassment, abuse, inequity and discrimination, and women, and men, will continue to tell their stories.For example, liturgies of listening, like the one held at General Convention, have continued across the church. During its 242nd annual convention in November, the Diocese of New York held a Liturgy for Listening and Lamentation.The six stories read during the service were submitted through an anonymous, confidential form. They mostly touched on the less obvious forms of harassment, the inappropriate sexual advance, the belittling of a woman’s leadership position based on her age or physical appearance, a married priest’s awkward come-on at the bar during a clergy conference.“The stories are more nuanced. Sometimes, it’s difficult for women, and it’s mostly women, in part we’re dealing in a world of microaggression … a subtler form of oppression,” said New York Assistant Bishop Mary D. Glasspool in an interview with ENS following the service. “Like paper cuts, each one individually is seen as small, even innocuous, but you put them all together, and there’s just a preponderance of what’s really toxic for people and demoralizing and filled with shame.”The Diocese of New York has its own #MeToo Task Force, and after diocesan convention, it established a help line which people can call to share their stories and seek help. Still, the journey is just getting started and will take shape over time, Glasspool said.“We didn’t get here overnight, and we’re not going to change it overnight. That’s why the journey, the movement part of it … it’s something that we have to continue to work on,” said Glasspool, adding that sexual harassment and abuse are not unlike the sin of racism.“It’s clearly not the case in this country that, because we had a black president for eight years, we’ve dealt with racism. It’s not the case in the church that, because we had a female presiding bishop for nine years, that we’ve completely dealt with sexism,” she said. “It’s just not the case.”The resolutions put forth by the Special Committee on Sexual Harassment and Exploitation and adopted by General Convention provide framework beyond storytelling for the church to use over the triennium to address issues brought to light by the #MeToo movement, in both the church and the larger society.Liturgies and storytelling are an important part of healing, but there’s more to the work, said Jennings.“The real work, the ongoing work, is to change the culture and the structures of the church that allow gender-based harassment, exploitation and violence, and to recommit, and I hope that General Convention helped us redouble our efforts for the church to advocate for women’s safety and equality in the world because we are obligated to do it, all of it, because our own tradition has helped create a culture where that’s acceptable,” said Jennings.“If the church has helped to create this culture, it’s also our responsibility to help dismantle it.”– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. She can be reached at [email protected] Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis #MeToo, Rector Smithfield, NC By Lynette WilsonPosted Jan 24, 2019 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI General Convention 2018 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Church, wider culture continue to address sexual harassment, abuse in #MeToo age An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, IDlast_img read more

Presiding Bishop’s Word to the Church: When the cameras are…

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group George Floyd Statements, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Racial Justice & Reconciliation Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted May 30, 2020 Back to Press Releases Submit a Press Release [May 30, 2020] A word to the Church from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry:“Our long-term commitment to racial justice and reconciliation is embedded in our identity as baptized followers of Jesus. We will still be doing it when the news cameras are long gone.”In the midst of COVID-19 and the pressure cooker of a society in turmoil, a Minnesota man named George Floyd was brutally killed. His basic human dignity was stripped by someone charged to protect our common humanity.Perhaps the deeper pain is the fact that this was not an isolated incident. It happened to Breonna Taylor on March 13 in Kentucky. It happened to Ahmaud Arbery on February 23 in Georgia. Racial terror in this form occurred when I was a teenager growing up black in Buffalo, New York. It extends back to the lynching of Emmett Till in 1955 and well before that. It’s not just our present or our history. It is part of the fabric of American life.But we need not be paralyzed by our past or our present. We are not slaves to fate but people of faith. Our long-term commitment to racial justice and reconciliation is embedded in our identity as baptized followers of Jesus. We will still be doing it when the news cameras are long gone.That work of racial reconciliation and justice – what we know as Becoming Beloved Community – is happening across our Episcopal Church. It is happening in Minnesota and in the Dioceses of Kentucky, Georgia and Atlanta, across America and around the world. That mission matters now more than ever, and it is work that belongs to all of us.It must go on when racist violence and police brutality are no longer front-page news. It must go on when the work is not fashionable, and the way seems hard, and we feel utterly alone. It is the difficult labor of picking up the cross of Jesus like Simon of Cyrene, and carrying it until no one – no matter their color, no matter their class, no matter their caste – until no child of God is degraded and disrespected by anybody. That is God’s dream, this is our work, and we shall not cease until God’s dream is realized.Is this hopelessly naïve? No, the vision of God’s dream is no idealistic utopia. It is our only real hope. And, St. Paul says, “hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts by the Holy Spirit” (Romans 5:5). Real love is the dogged commitment to live my life in the most unselfish, even sacrificial ways; to love God, love my neighbor, love the earth and truly love myself. Perhaps most difficult in times like this, it is even love for my enemy. That is why we cannot condone violence. Violence against any person – conducted by some police officers or by some protesters – is violence against a child of God created in God’s image. No, as followers of Christ, we do not condone violence.Neither do we condone our nation’s collective, complicit silence in the face of injustice and violent death. The anger of so many on our streets is born out  of the accumulated frustration that so few seem to care when another black, brown or native life is snuffed out.But there is another way. In the parable of the Good Samaritan, a broken man lay on the side of the road. The religious leaders who passed were largely indifferent. Only the Samaritan saw the wounded stranger and acted. He provided medical care and housing. He made provision for this stranger’s well-being. He helped and healed a fellow child of God.Love, as Jesus teaches, is action like this as well as attitude. It seeks the good, the well-being, and the welfare of others as well as one’s self. That way of real love is the only way there is.Accompanying this statement is a card describing ways to practice the Way of Love in the midst of pandemic, uncertainty and loss. In addition, you will find online a set of resources to help Episcopalians to LEARN, PRAY & ACT in response to racist violence and police brutality. That resource set includes faithful tools for listening to and learning from communities too often ignored or suppressed, for incorporating God’s vision of justice into your personal and community prayer life, and for positively and constructively engaging in advocacy and public witness.Opening and changing hearts does not happen overnight. The Christian race is not a sprint; it is a marathon. Our prayers and our work for justice, healing and truth-telling must be unceasing. Let us recommit ourselves to following in the footsteps of Jesus, the way that leads to healing, justice and love. “What Does Love Do: The Way of Love during Pandemic” Additional Resources for Responding to Racist Violence and Police Brutality[3 de junio de 2020] “Nuestro compromiso de largo plazo con la justicia y la reconciliación racial está incrustado en nuestra identidad como seguidores bautizados de Jesús. Seguiremos haciéndolo cuando las cámaras de las noticias se hayan ido”.En medio del COVID-19 y la olla a presión de una sociedad en crisis, un hombre de Minnesota llamado George Floyd fue brutalmente asesinado. Su dignidad humana fundamental fue despojada por alguien encargado de proteger nuestra humanidad común.Tal vez el dolor más profundo es el hecho de que este no es un incidente aislado. Le pasó a Breonna Taylor el 13 de marzo en Kentucky. Le pasó a Ahmaud Arbery el 23 de febrero en Georgia. Este tipo de terror racial ocurrió cuando era un adolescente de raza negra viviendo en Buffalo, Nueva York. Se remonta al linchamiento de Emmett Till en 1955 y mucho antes de eso. No es sólo nuestro presente o nuestra historia. Es parte del tejido de la vida americana.Pero no necesitamos estar paralizados por nuestro pasado o nuestro presente. No somos esclavos del destino, sino gente de fe. Nuestro compromiso a largo plazo con la justicia y la reconciliación racial está incrustado en nuestra identidad como seguidores bautizados de Jesús. Seguiremos haciéndolo cuando las cámaras de las noticias se hayan ido.Ese trabajo de reconciliación y justicia racial – lo que conocemos como “Convertirse en una Comunidad de Amor” – se está llevando a cabo en toda nuestra Iglesia Episcopal. Se está dando en Minnesota y en las Diócesis de Kentucky, y de Atlanta, Georgia, por todo Estados Unidos y el mundo. Esa misión revierte ahora más importancia que nunca, y es un trabajo que nos corresponde a todos.Debe continuar cuando la violencia racial y la brutalidad policial ya no sean noticia de primera plana. Debe continuar cuando esa labor ya no esté de moda, cuando el camino parezca difícil y nos sintamos completamente solos. Es la difícil tarea de tomar la cruz de Jesús como Simón de Cirene y cargarla hasta que nadie – no importa su color, no importa su clase, no importa su casta – hasta que ningún hijo de Dios sea degradado e irrespetado por otra persona. Ése es el sueño de Dios, ésta es nuestra tarea y no pararemos hasta que el sueño de Dios se haga realidad.¿Es esto desesperadamente ingenuo? No, la visión del sueño de Dios no es una utopía idealista. Es nuestra única esperanza real. San Pablo dice “la esperanza no nos decepciona, porque el amor de Dios ha sido derramado en nuestros corazones por el Espíritu Santo” (Romanos 5:5). El verdadero amor es el compromiso tenaz de vivir mi vida de la manera más desinteresada, incluso sacrificada; de amar a Dios, amar al prójimo, amar la tierra y amarme verdaderamente. Tal vez lo más difícil en tiempos como estos es amar a mi enemigo. Por eso no podemos aprobar la violencia. La violencia contra cualquier persona, llevada a cabo por algunos policías o por algunos manifestantes, es violencia contra un hijo de Dios creado a imagen de Dios. Como seguidores de Cristo, no toleramos la violencia.Tampoco toleramos el silencio colectivo y cómplice de nuestra nación frente a la injusticia y la muerte violenta. La ira de muchos en nuestras calles nace de la frustración acumulada cuando parece importarle a muy pocos que otra vida negra, marrón o nativa se apague.Pero hay otra manera. En la parábola del Buen Samaritano, un hombre destruido yacía a un lado del camino. Los líderes religiosos que pasaban a su lado mostraban mucha indiferencia. Sólo el Samaritano vio al extraño herido e hizo algo al respecto. Le brindó atención médica y vivienda. Dio de si para el bienestar de este extraño. Ayudó y sanó a su prójimo, un hijo de Dios.El amor, como enseña Jesús, es una acción como la del samaritano y es también una actitud. Busca el bien, el bienestar y la prosperidad de los demás y de uno mismo. El camino del verdadero amor es el único camino que hay.Adjunto a esta declaración encontrarán una tarjeta que indica las formas de practicar El Camino del Amor en medio de la pandemia, la incertidumbre y la pérdida. Además, encontrarán en línea un conjunto de recursos para ayudar a los episcopales a APRENDER, ORAR Y ACTUAR en respuesta a la violencia racial y la brutalidad policial. Ese conjunto de recursos incluye herramientas religiosas para escuchar y aprender de las comunidades que con demasiada frecuencia son ignoradas o suprimidas, para incorporar la visión de justicia de Dios en la vida de oración personal y comunitaria, y para participar de manera positiva y constructiva en la representación activa, defensoría y el testimonio público.Abrir y cambiar los corazones no sucede de la noche a la mañana. La carrera cristiana no es una caminata, es un maratón. Nuestras oraciones y nuestro trabajo por la justicia, la sanación y la verdad deben ser incesantes. Comprometámonos nuevamente a seguir los pasos de Jesús, el camino que lleva a la sanación, la justicia y el amor.“Qué Hace el Amor: El Camino del Amor durante una Pandemia”  Recursos adicionales para responder a la violencia racial[3 juin 2020] Un mot à l’Eglise de la part de l’évêque président Michael Curry :“Notre engagement à long terme en faveur de la justice et de la réconciliation raciales est ancré dans notre identité de disciples baptisés de Jésus. Nous continuerons à le faire lorsque les caméras des médias seront parties depuis longtemps”.Au beau milieu de COVID-19 et de la cocotte-minute d’une société en plein bouleversement, un homme du Minnesota nommé George Floyd a été brutalement assassiné. Sa dignité humaine fondamentale a été dépouillée par une personne chargée de protéger notre humanité commune.La douleur la plus profonde est peut-être le fait que ce n’est pas un incident isolé. C’est ce qui est arrivé à Breonna Taylor le 13 mars dans le Kentucky. C’est ce qui est arrivé à Ahmaud Arbery le 23 février en Géorgie. Cette forme de terreur raciale s’est produite lorsque j’étais un adolescent noir qui vivait à Buffalo, dans l’État de New York. Elle remonte au lynchage d’Emmett Till en 1955 et bien avant cela. Ce n’est pas seulement notre présent ou notre histoire. Elle fait partie du tissu de la vie américaine.Mais nous ne devons pas être paralysés par notre passé ou notre présent. Nous ne sommes pas des esclaves du destin, mais des personnes qui ont la foi. Nous suivons les traces de Jésus de Nazareth, qui nous conduit dans la mission de Dieu. Cette mission a changé le monde du premier siècle et elle peut changer le XXIe siècle. Cette mission sous-tend le travail de réconciliation et de justice qui se fait dans notre Église épiscopale. Cette mission se déroule dans le Minnesota et dans les diocèses du Kentucky, de la Géorgie et d’Atlanta, en Amérique et au monde entier. Cette mission de “Devenir la communauté bien-aimée” est plus importante que jamais, et c’est un travail qui appartient à nous tous.Elle doit se poursuivre lorsque les caméras ne sont plus présentes et lorsque la violence raciale ne fait plus la une des journaux. Elle doit se poursuivre lorsque ce travail n’est pas à la mode, que le chemin semble difficile et que nous nous sentons totalement seuls. C’est le travail difficile de ramasser la croix de Jésus comme Simon de Cyrène dans la Bible, et de la porter jusqu’à ce que personne – quelle que soit sa couleur, sa classe, sa caste – jusqu’à ce qu’aucun enfant de Dieu ne soit dégradé et méprisé par quelqu’un d’autre. C’est le rêve de Dieu, c’est notre travail, et nous ne cesserons pas de le faire jusqu’à ce que le rêve de Dieu soit réalisé.Est-ce désespérément naïf ? Non, la vision du rêve de Dieu n’est pas une utopie idéaliste. C’est notre seul espoir réel. Et, comme le dit saint Paul, «l’espérance ne trompe point, parce que l’amour de Dieu est répandu dans nos cœurs par le Saint-Esprit qui nous a été donné » (Romains 5, 5). Le véritable amour est l’engagement obstiné de vivre ma vie de la manière la plus désintéressée, voire sacrificielle ; d’aimer Dieu, d’aimer mon prochain, d’aimer la terre et de m’aimer vraiment moi-même. Le plus difficile dans des moments comme ceux-ci, c’est peut-être même l’amour pour mon ennemi. C’est pourquoi nous ne pouvons pas tolérer la violence. La violence contre toute personne – exercée par certains policiers ou par certains manifestants – est une violence contre un enfant de Dieu créé à l’image de Dieu. Non, en tant que disciples du Christ, nous ne tolérons pas la violence.Nous ne tolérons pas non plus le silence collectif et complice de notre nation face à l’injustice et à la mort violente. La colère de beaucoup dans nos rues est née de la frustration accumulée alors que très peu semblent se soucier de l’extinction d’une autre vie noire, brune ou autochtone.Mais il y a une autre solution. Dans la parabole du Bon Samaritain, un homme détruit gisait sur le bord de la route. Les guides religieux qui passaient a côté étaient largement indifférents. Seul le Samaritain a vu l’étranger blessé et a agi. Il a fourni des soins médicaux et un logement. Il a veillé au bien-être de cet étranger. Il a aidé et guéri un autre enfant de Dieu.L’amour, comme l’enseigne Jésus, est une action comme celle-ci ainsi qu’une attitude. Il recherche le bien, le bien-être et la prospérité des autres ainsi que de soi-même. Cette voie du véritable amour est la seule qui existe.Cette déclaration est accompagnée d’une carte décrivant les moyens de pratiquer la Voie de l’Amour au milieu de la pandémie, de l’incertitude et de la perte. De plus, vous trouverez en ligne un ensemble de ressources pour aider les épiscopaliens à APPRENDRE, PRIER et AGIR en réponse à la violence raciste. Cet ensemble de ressources comprend des outils religieux pour écouter et apprendre des communautés trop souvent ignorées ou réprimées, pour incorporer la vision de justice de Dieu dans la vie de prière personnelle et communautaire, et pour vous engager de manière positive et constructive dans la défense des droits et le témoignage public.Ouvrir et changer les cœurs ne se fait pas du jour au lendemain. La course chrétienne n’est pas un sprint, c’est un marathon. Nos prières et notre travail pour la justice, la guérison et la vérité doivent être incessants. Engageons-nous à nouveau à suivre les pas de Jésus, le chemin qui mène à la guérison, à la justice et à l’amour. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Featured Events Presiding Bishop’s Word to the Church: When the Cameras are Gone, We Will Still Be Here Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

Diocese of San Diego enlisted to plan pastoral care for…

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Immigration Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Diocese of San Diego enlisted to plan pastoral care for hundreds of unaccompanied teen migrants Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing By David PaulsenPosted Mar 26, 2021 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Asylum-seeking unaccompanied minors from Central America take refuge March 19 near a baseball field after crossing the Rio Grande into the United States from Mexico on rafts, in La Joya, Texas. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Diocese of San Diego is developing a plan with ecumenical partners in Southern California to provide spiritual support for hundreds of unaccompanied teenage migrants whom the federal government will begin housing starting this weekend at the San Diego Convention Center.About 500 girls ages 13 to 17 are expected to arrive March 27, followed by another 500 or so on March 29, according to San Diego Bishop Susan Brown Snook. Her diocese was contacted this week by a federal contractor to help coordinate worship and chaplaincy services for the unaccompanied minors. Those plans are still taking shape.“Really, we’re in the stage of figuring out what this might look like,” Snook said in a phone interview with ENS on March 26. “We’re basically building the plane while we’re flying it.”Up to 1,400 unaccompanied minors eventually could be held at the convention center, she said, part of a wave of migrants that have crossed the U.S. border in the past two months as the Biden administration has sought to revise and, in some cases, reverse the Trump administration’s immigration policies.The U.S. Border Patrol detained more than 11,000 unaccompanied minors in the first three weeks of March, after more than 9,000 such detentions the previous month, according to CNN. Individual children are only a fraction of the migrants apprehended crossing the border, many of them seeking asylum.Local officials announced early this week that the San Diego Convention Center was one of the sites along the border where those children will be held while the federal government makes arrangements for them to stay with relatives in the United States or with foster families. Another large boarding facility already has opened at a convention center in Dallas, Texas.The federal contractor overseeing social services for the unaccompanied minors in San Diego contacted the Episcopal diocese because of the diocese’s connection to Episcopal Community Services, a diocesan institution that provides services as a separate nonprofit. The diocese’s role in assisting the migrant girls will be limited to faith services.Snook said the contractor’s request was for a religious services team – volunteers able to lead worship with the migrants, whose faith backgrounds range from Roman Catholic to evangelical. Episcopal leaders are working with local Roman Catholic and Lutheran leaders and other ecumenical partners to develop worship options.The team could start with a Palm Sunday service on March 28, though plans are tentative and may depend on pandemic precautions. Snook told ENS that volunteer chaplains might be limited to those who have been vaccinated against COVID-19.The chaplains won’t be involved with behavioral counseling, Snook said, but they may have opportunities to pray with the girls and provide other pastoral care upon request.“We’ve been told many of these girls are deeply traumatized, and some are pregnant,” Snook said. “They’ve all been through terrible experiences, and they’re all without their parents.”Border dioceses like San Diego have been doing “heroic work” in recent years as they live up to The Episcopal Church’s long legacy of serving refugees and migrants, said the Rev. Charles Robertson, the presiding bishop’s canon for ministry beyond The Episcopal Church. This still-developing opportunity to assist unaccompanied minors in San Diego coincides with the church’s ongoing call “to help folks who are trying to find new homes and new hope,” Robertson told ENS.In recent years, the Episcopal dioceses along the southern border have prioritized ministries of support for asylum-seekers within their dioceses. Diocesan leaders have said their efforts to continue providing that direct support were complicated by the Trump administration’s “remain in Mexico policy,” which blocked migrants on the southern U.S. border from waiting in the United States while their cases are pending.President Joe Biden vowed to reverse that policy while avoiding a surge of migrants on the border, but his administration still has faced the challenges of processing tens of thousands of migrants each month.Biden, in a news conference on March 25, said the wave of migrants seeking to cross into the U.S. is partly cyclical, not solely caused by changes in federal policies. He rejected what he saw as the previous administration’s unprecedented decision to let migrants languish on the Mexican side of the border while they followed lawful avenues for seeking asylum in the U.S.“I can’t guarantee we’re going to solve everything,” he said. “But I can guarantee you we can make everything better. I can make it better. We can change the lives of so many people.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Faith & Politics, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries, last_img read more

Construction to Disrupt 441/429 Connector Road

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your name here TAGSWekiva Parkway Previous articleGot Prediabetes? 1 in 3 Do … and Don’t Know ItNext articleObama Administration Visits Orange County Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Crews are scheduled to close Connector Road to through traffic at State Road 429 (Daniel Webster Western Beltway) near US 441 beginning Sunday, July 31, 2016. The intersection closures are scheduled from 7 p.m. – 6 a.m. nightly through August 31, 2016 to allow crews to set bridge beams as part of building the Wekiva Parkway (State Road 429).No through traffic will be allowed on the Connector Road at SR 429 during this operation. This work will require closing the SR 429 northbound left-turn lanes at the Connector Road at night. The SR 429 northbound right-turn lane onto the Connector Road will remain open to provide access to Plymouth Sorrento Road and US 441.Motorists on Plymouth Sorrento Road who wish to go south on SR 429 must turn right onto US 441, and then turn right onto the Connector Road to access the southbound SR 429 ramp.Flaggers will direct traffic and electronic message boards are posted to alert drivers. Bad weather or other unforeseen circumstances could delay or prolong work. Motorists are urged to use caution in the construction area for their safety and that of the work crews.This work is part of the Central Florida Expressway Authority’s $56 million project to build the Wekiva Parkway from where the SR 429 currently ends at the Connector Road to just north of Ponkan Road. This project is among five parkway sections being built by CFX, totaling 10 miles and more than $270 million in construction costs. Once completed, the 25-mile parkway will complete Central Florida’s beltway, while helping to protect the natural resources surrounding the Wekiva River. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Biggest Apopka stories of 2016: Alonzo Williams Park gets a new…

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSAlonzo Williams ParkCity of Apopka Previous articleBiggest Apopka stories of 2016: Moore defeats FitzpatrickNext articleAffordable health insurance still available Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Editor’s Note: This is the 16th in a series of articles published by The Apopka Voice in 2016 that were the most noteworthy events of the year. The Apopka Voice will publish them starting Monday, December 26th and running until Sunday, January 1st. On January, 2nd we will publish a poll and let the readers decide on which story is the most impactful of the year.  $750,000 Federal Grant paves the wayFirst Published: November 18th, 2016  Alonzo Williams Park is getting a new community center building, thanks to a newly awarded $750,000 federal grant presented through the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity.The 5,500 square foot center will be twice as large as the current building.The long-awaited project will demolish the existing structure at Alonzo Williams Park, and construct a new community center in its place. The new building will be twice the size of the existing facility with more than 5,500 square feet, and feature a large meeting area, offices, activity rooms and a covered entry with a vehicle driveway. It will also include paved parking along M.A. Board Street and future parking adjacent to the facility.“Thank you Team Apopka! More than a dozen dedicated staff members who work for the City of Apopka collaborated to pursue this grant opportunity, and I am grateful for their hard work,” Mayor Joe Kilsheimer said. “Alonzo Williams Park has the potential to serve many purposes for Apopka residents, from organized after-school programs to pick-up games of soccer and basketball. The new community center will enrich everyone’s experience and serve its surrounding neighborhoods for many years to come.”The federal grant is administered by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, which provides between $18 and $26 million in federal funds each year to benefit local governments.Construction of the new facility could begin next year, according to a press release from the City of Apopka.Pastor Hezekiah Bradford, President of the South Apopka Ministerial Alliance, was ecstatic with the outcome and commended the City for its perseverance.“I would like to congratulate the City of Apopka for not giving up,” said Bradford. ” (City Administrator) Glenn Irby and his staff are to be commended. This is really going to be a major plus for South Apopka. Hopefully citywide events can be held at this location after the new community center is completed.”Apopka businessman Rod Love believes it is a great first step, but it will take the people of Apopka to tap its full potential.“The $750,000 State of Florida award for the renovations of Alonzo Williams park is great news for the residents of the community of Apopka,” said Love, the co-chairman of the Community Task Force on Violence. “Bricks and mortar will set the tone for the foundation, what strengthens it must be a total community effort, working with the City of Apopka, law enforcement, faith and community leaders, but most importantly, working with the people of the community to ensure maximum utilization of this facility.”Alonzo Williams is a three-acre facility with multi-purpose fields, outdoor basketball courts, a softball field and a playground. Earlier this year, it also received a separate $50,000 grant through the Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program to improve its recreation areas. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your comment!last_img read more

5 ways to make your vehicle more fuel efficient

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img TAGSFuel Efficiency Previous articleNHL Veteran Chad LaRose joins Orlando Solar BearsNext articleHave pride in your neighborhood and the funds to show it Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment!  A small investment now can save you money in the futureOver the last decade, fuel economy has become an important factor for many car buyers and has become a focus for car engineers as well. Even if you aren’t in the market to buy a new, more fuel efficient car, there are a few ways you can increase your car’s fuel efficiency with a few minor changes. 1. Ease up on the GasIf you’re zooming off from stop signs and lights, you’re wasting a good deal of gas. Ease up a little bit at those stopping points and coast when you can, and you will save on your gas economy.2. Use Recommended OctaneUsing the recommended octane. Even if it is lower, it means your car is running most efficiently. A higher octane really does nothing for your fuel economy; it’s more for preventing dangerous combustion.3. AerodynamicsTo reduce weight, clean out the unnecessary junk in your car and get rid of the roof rack that you’re not using. Changing your tires to a light weight, light resistance tire will also help by creating less of a load and less resistance, allowing your car to run more efficiently. Also, check your tires to make sure that they are properly filled, as low tires means more friction.4. Keep up with your MaintenanceKeeping your maintenance up to date helps your car stay in top condition and last longer. This includes keeping your engine and fuel components working at their best with regular filter changes, oil changes, rotation and balance of your tires, and replacement of spark plugs. Keeping fuel levels at their proper levels helps with this as well. You can also use fuel injectors in order to keep your fuel tank clean and combusting properly.5. Remap your Engine Control Unit (ECU)You can also remap your ECU. This takes some knowledge on tuning and working with your car’s computer system, but if you know how, or know someone who does, it can make a big difference in the amount of fuel your car is consuming.With a combination of these changes, you could potentially save up to 15% in fuel consumption meaning a 15% decrease in the amount you spend on fuel equaling around $400 a year or more. UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 last_img read more

Cookies and milk with a cop coming Saturday

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Take your kids to the North Orange Library in Apopka this Saturday (May 20th) from 10:30 am – 11:30 am to meet Apopka Police Officers for cookies and milk (& a story). This is a time for children to interact with local police officers in a fun and informative environment. The North Orange County Branch Library is at 1211 East Semoran Boulevard in Apopka.The Cookies and Milk with a Cop is an initiative started by Officer Andrew Raphael of the Winter Garden Police Department last year. The goal is to bring kids and Cops together in a fun and non-traditional environment that builds trust and makes friends.Cookies and Milk with a Cop is a joint venture between the Apopka Police Department, the Apopka Main Street McDonald’s restaurant and the North Orange Branch Library in Apopka.The APD provides a police officer for reading to the children.McDonald’s provides the cookies and milk.The Apopka Library provides a comfortable setting for the event.The events are held at 10:30 AM on the 3rd Saturday of each month. Please enter your name here TAGSApopka Police DepartmentCookies and Milk with a CopMcDonald’sNorth Orange County Library Previous articleOn Peace Officers Memorial Day, we honor the responders of last resortNext articleHabitat for Humanity/Apopka gains new sponsor Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more