Watch Full Sets From The Nth Power And Jen Hartswick On ‘Jenth Power Tour’ Opening Night

first_imgPowerhouse quintet The Nth Power and esteemed jazz vocalist and trumpet player Jennifer Hartswick (Trey Anastasio Band) opened a five-show run together at The Acoustic in Bridgeport, CT last night. Dubbed the “Jenth Power Tour,” Hartswick and her band featuring keyboardist Rob Marscher, bassist Dezron Douglas as well as Nth Power members drummer Nikki Glaspie and guitarist Nick Cassarino opened the evening’s festivities with several selections from Hartswick’s upcoming new album before giving way to the Nth Power’s set.Hartswick’s ties with the Nth Power run deep, as it was her late night show at Jazz Fest in 2012 that first breathed life into the band that now includes Glaspie, Cassarino, bass player Nate Edgar, West African master percussionist Weedie Braimah and keyboardist Courtney “Jay-Mel” Smith. During last night’s performance at The Acoustic, the Nth Power ran through several songs from the band’s soulful 2015 album Abundance, including “Walk On Water,” “Soul Survivor,” “Right Now” and “Holy Rain.” In addition, Glaspie dedicated the encore to Daryl Coley, an acclaimed gospel singer who had died earlier in the day.Watch complete show footage of the Jennifer Hartswick Band and The Nth Power last night via TheAcoustic:Be sure to catch The Nth Power at Fool’s Paradise, hosted by Lettuce, from April 1-2 at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre in St. Augustine, FL. Lettuce and The Nth Power will perform, alongside GRiZ, Vulfpeck, Chris Robinson’s Soul Revue, Goldfish, Break Science and more! Info can be found here.[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

Study flags later risks for sleep-deprived kids

first_imgChildren ages 3 to 7 who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control, and peer relationships in mid-childhood, according to a new study led by a Harvard pediatrician.Reported online in the journal Academic Pediatrics, the study found significant differences in the responses of parents and teachers to surveys regarding executive function — which includes attention, working memory, reasoning, and problem-solving — and behavioral problems in 7-year-old children depending on how much sleep they regularly received at younger ages.“We found that children who get an insufficient amount of sleep in their preschool and early school-age years have a higher risk of poor neurobehavioral function at around age 7,” says Elsie Taveras, a pediatrics professor at Harvard Medical School and chief of general pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, who led the study. “The associations between insufficient sleep and poorer functioning persisted even after adjusting for several factors that could influence the relationship.”The study analyzed data from Project Viva, a long-term investigation of the health impacts of several factors during pregnancy and after birth. Information used in this study was gathered from mothers in interviews when their children were around 6 months, 3 years, and 7 years old, and from questionnaires completed when the children were ages 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6. In addition, mothers and teachers were sent survey instruments evaluating executive function and behavioral issues when children were around 7.Among 1,046 children enrolled in Project Viva, the study team determined which children were not receiving the recommended amount of sleep at specific age categories — 12 hours or longer at ages 6 months to 2 years; 11 hours or longer at 3 to 4 years; and 10 hours or longer at 5 to 7 years. Children living in homes with lower household incomes and whose mothers had lower education levels were likelier to sleep less than nine hours at ages 5 to 7. Other factors associated with insufficient sleep were TV and a high body mass. African-Americans were more likely to not get enough sleep.The reports from both mothers and teachers regarding the neurobehavioral function of enrolled children found similar associations between poor functioning and not receiving sufficient sleep, with teachers reporting even greater problems. Although no association was observed between insufficient sleep during infancy — ages 6 months to 2 years — and reduced neurobehavioral functioning in mid-childhood, Taveras notes that sleep levels during infancy often predict levels at later ages, supporting the importance of promoting a good quantity and quality of sleep from the youngest ages.“Our previous studies have examined the role of insufficient sleep on chronic health problems — including obesity — in both mothers and children,” said Taveras. “The results of this new study indicate that one way in which poor sleep may lead to these chronic disease outcomes is by its effects on inhibition, impulsivity, and other behaviors that may lead to excess consumption of high-calorie foods. It will be important to study the longer-term effects of poor sleep on health and development as children enter adolescence, which is already underway through Project Viva.”last_img read more

Sumner outscored by Narraguagus

first_img Latest Posts Scott Wolley gave up five hits and struck out 14 batters as he pitched the Narraguagus Knights to a 7-2 win over the Sumner Tigers on Saturday in Sullivan.Spencer Thompson tripled and drove in two runs and Nick Kennedy singled twice for the Knights.Dylan Whitten had a pair of singles and drove in a run and Tyler Matthews had a runs-scoring single for the 0-2 Tigers.Find in-depth coverage of local news in The Ellsworth American. Subscribe digitally or in print. Bio Is this the kind of government we deserve? – July 10, 2017 Latest posts by Hugh Bowden (see all) This is placeholder textThis is placeholder text GSA surges in 4th to win Northern Maine title – February 26, 2017 Like he did in the ’60s, Noel Paul Stookey sings out in troubling times – December 27, 2017 Hugh BowdenExecutive EditorHugh writes editorials, covers Hancock County sports and helps out where needed in The American’s editorial department. When he’s not on the sidelines, he enjoys playing jazz and tennis. [email protected]last_img read more