moe. Delivers Emotionally-Charged Huckleberry Jam Set [Audio/Video]

first_imgmoe. played their second-to-last show before the coming hiatus to an appreciative crowd of long time fans and fresh faces last night at the Huckleberry Jam Festival. While bassist Robert Derhak seeks treatment for a rare but highly survivable form of cancer, the band will take time off for the healing process. Idahoans have been looking forward to moe.’s return to their fair state, and even though the circumstances had a somber edge, they were more than pleased at the stellar performance they witnessed.Last week’s show in New York served as a celebration for the band’s oldest fan base while the Huckleberry Jam gave moe.rons from the further reaches of the nation to come by and wish Derhak well. In the end it was a chance get down with the band for the last time for the immediate future, and thanks to a stocked set list, there was something for everyone.moe. and Aqueous To Join Forces As “moe.queous” At Brooklyn Comes AliveFrom set one opener “Moth” on, the music never stopped. Before they managed to finish “Moth,” the band wandered musically from a spacey solo into the well-received opening strains of “Puebla.” The massive jam from guitarist Al Schnier in the back half of “Puebla” calmed slightly before picking up pace and morphing into a ripping take on the Chuck Garvey led “Annihilation Blues.”Check out some video posted by moe. of their run closing first set below:moe. only paused a moment at best before the psychedelic strains of “Silver Sun” wafted from Schnier’s guitar. Drummer Vinnie Amico displayed his usual depth and control–as no matter the pace needed, the timing was ever-perfect. The last note of “Silver Sun” morphed perfectly into a set closing pair of songs from Garvey, “Four>Akimbo,” a spirited, extended instrumental, improvised intro.Observant fans had noted the lack of Derhak-led pieces in the first set, which though disappointing is perfectly understandable in light of the medical issues he faces. Luckily for all in attendance, his playing hasn’t been affected at all and his vive was up to backing vocal duties and even a couple of leads.Second set opener “Recreational Chemistry” showcased the band at their most expressive. Derhak strummed, plucked and slapped his bass with a frenzied passion that has made him a force to be reckoned with over the last few decades. Percussionist Jim Loughlin delighted as always with his bag of tricks, including his ever sharpening mallet skills as they progressed into the nearly instrumental “Meat.”As the crowd joyfully digested the massive “Meat” they were given, moe. gracefully returned to the final strains of the show opener “Moth” to close the set. Again, with the hiatus looming, it was nice of them to provide a sense of musical closure to their adoring fans who will be counting the days until their beloved band returns to the stage.Here are some second set highlights from the band’s Facebook:One of the greatest messages in any of moe.’s songs comes in the Garvey-sung “Wind It Up,” and it served as the perfect first of the two song encore that closed the show. “As the crowd passionately joined in the sing-around-chorus “Be on my side, I’m on your side,” the message was abundantly clear. They were there to represent a nation of fans who want nothing more than the speedy return to full health from the man who has stood at the center of the stage for as long as moe. has made their magic.Taking the mic for moe.’s last song of the night, Rob Derhak used the moments before to thank the audience and quietly promise to be back “…sometime soon.” Guitarist Al Schnier thanked the festival for allowing them an extra half hour of stage time to thank the fans who traveled from all points to come and see their band off in style.As the last note rang out, Derhak again thanked the crowd and told them he loved them. Though he surely knows after these last weeks of massive outpourings of well wishes that his love is returned, magnified a thousand times over. Cancer is a scourge on all walks of life, and most of us have had someone we know and love affected by the disease’s many forms.I’ve been lucky enough to get to know Mr. Derhak over the years and I know him to be a man of layers. Under a sometimes thick skin is a heart of gold, but under that is someone who enjoys a good fight, a hard knock, and the satisfaction of rising up after taking a blow. That spirit should serve Derhak well in this fight, and on behalf of Live For Live Music, and the nation of moe.rons of who I am proudly a member, I wish him a speedy and full recovery.Get well sir…we will be waiting when you are ready to rock once again!.moe has one final performance at LOCKN’ with Phil Lesh before taking their hiatus.Listen to last night’s full show below, courtesy of mark r. smith:moe. | The Huckleberry Jam | 07-28-2017 | Donnelly, IDSet I: Moth>Puebla>Annihilation Blues, Silver Sun, Four> AkimboSet II: Recreational Chemistry>Meat>MothEncore: Wind It UpEncore II:Captain America[Cover photo by Paul Citone from previous show]last_img read more

Dutch regulator lowers ultimate forward rate to ‘more realistic’ level

first_imgThe Dutch regulator (DNB) has adjusted the ultimate forward rate (UFR) – used by local pension funds as a discount rate for liabilities since 2012 – from 4.2% to the more “realistic” level of 3.3%. The regulator said the move was unlikely to cause any further pension rights discounts.It conceded, however, that coverage ratios were set to drop “slightly” and that roughly a dozen schemes would have to submit recovery plans. The regulator also acknowledged that the drop in the UFR could lead to contribution increases but said this would depend on the way schemes had set up their premiums, as well as on current contribution levels.  With the adjustment, DNB follows the recommendations of a committee of Dutch experts commissioned by Jetta Klijnsma, state secretary for Social Affairs.Although the UFR committee published its findings in October 2013, the regulator called for its implementation to be postponed, pending the conclusion of Solvency II rules for insurers.It said the new UFR would better reflect market-rate developments and therefore ensure a more balanced approach for older and younger participants.“A too high discount rate,” it said, “would mean too generous pension benefits and too low contributions – and their effects being transferred to the future.”The UFR was meant to cushion pension funds and their participants against overly stringent measures as a response to financial market shocks.The initial discount rate was based fully on market rates.last_img read more

ICC World Cup This Italian Tennis player shouts ‘Bomb should explode’ on Wimbledon in fit of anger

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Fabio Fognini crashed out of the third round of Wimbledon.Nick Kyrgios deliberately blasted the ball at Rafael Nadal’s body.Bernard Tomic was stripped of his entire USD 56,600 prize money on for tanking in his first round match. highlightscenter_img Wimbledon: Fabio Fognini may face a fine for saying “a bomb should explode” on Wimbledon, All England Club chief executive Richard Lewis said on Monday. The Italian 12th seed made the outburst during his straight-sets third-round defeat to US world number 94 Tennys Sandgren on Saturday. “It’s fair to play here? Damned English, really. Damned, really. Wish a bomb would explode on this club. A bomb should explode here,” he fumed in Italian. He apologised afterwards, which Lewis said would be taken into account.”It was one of these heat of the moment comments. It was a very unfortunate comment and Fabio was good enough to apologise straight away,” the Wimbledon supremo said. “It wouldn’t surprise me in the end if there was a small fine but I think we will certainly keep it in context, and readily accept the apology.”During the first week of the championships, Australia’s Bernard Tomic was stripped of his entire USD 56,600 prize money on for tanking in his first round match, which was over in just 58 minutes. “Generally the behaviour has been outstanding,” said Lewis. “There’s been one or two high-profile incidents. But if you look back over the years, there’s always something going on. It’s one of the beauties of tennis, that it’s a head-to-head contest and emotions and passions run high and sometimes they slightly overspill in a way that there have to be some sanctions.”Meanwhile, Australian hothead Nick Kyrgios will not face action after he admitted deliberately blasting the ball at Rafael Nadal’s body during his defeat to the Spanish third seed. “It’s very common in doubles where players aim at the opponent. It’s part and parcel of being a professional tennis player,” said Lewis.    “That and underarm serving are very much within the rules of the sport.” Kyrgios hit two underarm serves during the match on Centre Court and also had a lengthy rant at the umpire. “Some of the conversational discussion Nick had with the umpire is maybe worthy of scrutiny,” Lewis added.last_img read more